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So this is a project I'm working on, partly to be functional, but also as a prop for my Dungeon and Dragon games. I want to correct the bend in this just a bit, so it's not as slanted, but still has the bend. I know wet wood is easy to bend, but this has been drying for over a year now. It's also got quite a bit of cracking. My end goal is to fill the cracks, smooth it out, fit a few crystals in, then add some fancy bits like a ribbon and grip.

Any advice on any of this would be appreciated greatly. I've already test fitted a brass grommet to the bottom and sanded it, but that's it. I think it's Yew.
 

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By the looks of it you found it dead. I've never had good success straightening found dead wood. Also, while you can generally straighten gentle curves, that curve is pretty big. Chances are you'll break it before it straightens. Given the rustic nature of the stick and the intended purpose I would probably leave it alone. The bottom looks like it's pretty close to the main axis of the stick the way it is.

If you do want to try, steam is your friend. Most of the guys here who straighten sticks have dedicated setups but I've also done a few by laying the stick over a big pot of boiling water and covering it. Give it at least a couple hours for a stick that size. You want the stick good and hot all the way through. The heat loosens up the lignins that hold the wood together so you can bend it.

Some guys also use heat guns. I don't own one so haven't tried it yet. If you go that route, keep the gun moving so you don't scorch the stick.

I forgot to add: Most guys have jigs for holding the sticks while they straighten them. You might be able to bend it over your knee if you're lucky. Have gloves and a towel to protect your knee ready. You also won't have long to work it before it cools too much to bend. You have to work fast. You can re-heat and try again.
 

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I think Rodney is right; that looks like a good candidate for breakage. If I were to try and straighten it, I think I'd try to rig up some sort of jig that could be held in a vise to apply slow gentle pressure to the outside edge of the curve, as opposed to putting force on the ends of the stick. After a good, long steaming, that is.

Grain looks a bit oak-ish to me, but I'm no expert.
 
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