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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brother in TN sent some sticks last fall including one piece approx 48" Autumn Olive and I just, this a.m., began attempting (key word) to remove the bark. The bark seems quite "tight" - yet in places it's loose, and I think I'll be able to remove a good portion by holding the stick in the vise and using hand chisels.

It appears, at first stages, it's going to be spectacular...after approx 79 years hand sanding...and I don't expect to be around here that much longer.

Any suggestions, anyone?

thanx

-neb

ps - pictures to follow, probably
 

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I'll be interested to know how you get on with that. I have a few autumn olive sticks drying and many still on the root. I may peel the next ones green if the bark is that hard to get off. I see many references to using them for walking sticks on line so am hoping they work well. I know they are considered invasive but if mine woud take over from the multifloral rose and honeysuckle I would be more than happy for the trade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have mentioned here on more than one occasion I enjoy giving the canes away, but I now have a new motivation - selling them for $50 each and giving the money to our church food pantry fund. Did that earlier this month, have another cane ready for the lady to come pick up, and have tentative order for "4-5" direct quote.

Our church feeds 700-800 families per week so the money is well spent.

Stay tuned

-neb

SOLD cane attached - Corkscrew Willow
 

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Feeding the hungry with walking sticks, what a great concept! :thumbsu: :thumbsu: Norson
 

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Yes, great thing your doing there.

Stubborn, hard bark, that has dried on with the stick I use an orbital sander with about a 60 grit disk on it. It works quickly and relatively easily. Because of the way the sander moves even with 60 grit it doesn't leave gouges or marks so finish hand sanding is easy as well.

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'd prefer not kicking up a lot of machine-created dust/dirt in my Man Cave . . . so until the weatherman cooperates I'll continue doing all the bark and underbark removal via hand sanding/chiseling. Perhaps by next month I'll be able to move my work bench (on casters) out into the driveway for the power sanding and try your suggestions.

Thank you

-neb
 

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My basic approach for hard and heavy bark is to start w. a farrier/mill knife made by Mora. Essentially an 11" long steel slab, w. 4" sharpened. I would suppose a knife made for bush craft would also work well. I make a series of hacks across the shaft, then push the blade down the row. This does make a mess of little chips.

If the bark is thin but tough, I start with a coarse rasp, which would have been used as the second tool after the Mora knife on thicker bark.

Then to a smoother rasp. Often after that I can get the wood almost sanded smooth just by using a cabinet scraper. Neither the coarse or finer rasps make dust as fine as most sandpaper, so its easier to sweep up. The scraper just makes shavings.
 

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Yes I agree using a scraper. I use one entirely with green sticks and bark I want peeled. Works very well and doesn't leaves nicks that have to be sanded out with effort afterwards.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Would any/either of you care to provide further info on the scrapers you use?

Size, etc? A picture also??

thank you

-neb
 

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Then too, when I was a kid, my uncle made a gun stock out of a chunk of walnut. He shaped it with a rasp and then went out behind the garage when my grandfather threw all the old broken Mason jars and picked up broken pieces to use for scrapers. I've done the same from time to time. It works pretty well but they don't stay sharp long. I still remember the smell of him scraping that walnut like it was yesterday.
 

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I found this online about that specie - certainly new to me

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Autumn olive is a deciduous shrub that can grow as tall as 20 feet. Its cream to pale yellow flowers bloom in early spring and bring on an abundance of pink to red berries dotted with scales. The leaves of the plant are elliptically shaped with a slightly wavy margin. It is distinguished from other similar shrubs by the silvery scales found on the lower leaf surface.

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Now that the weatherman is cooperating I'm able to work out in my man cave - this a.m. installed a 3" dia hardwood ball as the knob (using a dowel screw) and have applied the 1st coat (of many) polyurethane - more to be added later - this wood is SO unique - picture to follow.
 
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