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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I you tubed how to bend wood with steam to straighten or bend the shape. I had finish sanded the stick already, but gave it a go, and the shaping went well.

But...

I noticed, mostly because the rest of the stick was silky smooth, that the bends felt like the stick was almost opening space along the grain rings.

Is this going to weaken the wood, or will sanding it fix the rough spots with no other problems?
 

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Was it heated tough well but could be the grain a photo would help.

When steaming any part of the wood that has a indent in it will lift more than the main stem .Its a technique called ukibori the Japanese use it for decorative purposes

I used it to pattern a griffin walking sick it works well
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I resanded it already, so it doesn't show. It feels fine, and looks normal. I was afraid I made a future pop and snap while using it. I need to upgrade my steaming skills and tools. I am going to make a PVC steaming tube.

Thanks for the info. Feeling a bit better, because this stick has been my pet project. We've bonded
 

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I resanded it already, so it doesn't show. It feels fine, and looks normal. I was afraid I made a future pop and snap while using it. I need to upgrade my steaming skills and tools. I am going to make a PVC steaming tube.

Thanks for the info. Feeling a bit better, because this stick has been my pet project. We've bonded
Glad to read that the problem is solved.

A few things for future reference. My few experiences w. straightening wood have been unsatisfactory. Been reading up, and found a few things out. Better to straighten before the wood is fully cured. Once dried, the heat and/or steam don't have as much effect as when there is still water in the wood to carry the heat. One article said that kiln dried woods cannot be bet because the moisture content is so low.

Most of the sticks I gather are rather thick, as I usually intend to carve into the shaft. Typically, they are at the upper end of what is best for bending, or beyond.

Different woods do have different amounts they can be bent. I came across a reference showing the maximum bends different thin strips will take before the wood fiber breaks. My assumption is that thicker pieces of wood will start to break at lesser angles than thinner ones.
 

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I was told that if you bend the wood before its seasoned it will revert back to its original shape.

you do use large diameter wood than we do over here so suppose its more difficult to bend stick with dave will probable know better.
 

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Localized steam is also used to repair dents in wood surfaces.

I've steam bent 1 1/2" thick white oak boards for some replacement rocking chair runners before. I know you can go that far anyway.

Steaming wood will raise the grain. Just count on having to sand bare wood after steaming. It's a good idea when finish sanding to go over your surface with a damp rag and raise the grain then let it dry and lightly sand again. That will take care of any issues with raised grain before you start finishing the wood. I've only straightened one hazel shank so far. It went well without any issues. I think patience (something I don't have much of) is key.

Rodney
 

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for decorative puropses sand the stick then get a blunt tool something like a bolt place it on the wood give it a sharp tap with the hammer. sand the wood back to about levelof the holes you made then get a paint brush dip it in bioling water and dab the makes you made the wood will lift creating bumps that was origannly made .Its a way oe decorating the stick . It worked well on one of the griffins i made.
 
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