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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another cane finished - certainly not among my FAVs nor a KEEPER but perhaps some day it will serve someone well. You guys might recall my announcement about the handles received the day before Christmas 2015:

http://walkingstickforum.com/topic/1365-merry-christmas/?hl=merry

I decided this past week since I had a maple "stick" found laying on the ground this past July perhaps it was time to attempt to "marry" one of those FAB handles and see what might develop, for better or worse, in sickness and in health, forsaking all others . . . STOP HIM!

Can't anyone stop that foolishness?

:cool:

Here's some of the pictures, with text added.

I hope you have a very satisfactory Saturday.

-neb

ps - Isn't God good?!
 

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Well done. Nice looking cane.
 
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Nice cane. Its sometimes a nice option to have leaving the bark on and rhen once dried sanding it down and seeing the effect. That cane has some character.
 
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Norson, how do you go about drilling a hole that is perfectly aligned with the axis of the stick? I know, it sounds easy, but it often isn't, especially if your stick's axis can be defined differently by different sections of the not-so-straight stick.

You obviously have this down pat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for your kind words - ever heard the phrase 'practice makes perfect'? :cool:

I was showing my bride the cane I made for her in the summer of 2013 - back then I was still in the learning curve big time.

But what I'm doing now, for the most part . .

1) eyeball the center of each piece as best as I can - because they are tree limbs/branches/sticks measuring from side to side doesn't always work - for that section may be shaped like an egg (it's happened).

2) Mark the supposed centers with a black Sharpie

3) Using an awl I put a deep - sometimes quite deep - hole in that center

4) Using my corded electric drill drill two holes the first maybe 1/8" dia and then the other to match the threaded dowel screws, while holding the piece with my vise. Many times I will use my "torpedo" level to make certain the shank is level. Then, by watching the level on my drill motor I know I'm drilling a level hole . . . straight into the shank. There have been times when I've run the drill bit out the side of the shank - HATE when that happens!

5) I usually begin screwing the dowel screw into the handle first - taking it down approx half way - using my vice grips or channel locks. Initially I make certain the dowel screw is going in straight/not leaning.

6) Clamping the shank into my vise I apply wood glue to the flat surface and then by hand work the handle into place by screwing it in. Once it's tight I may turn a bit to line up with the shank - I try to match grains, if I can, etc.

7) I also wipe away any excess glue with a damp paper towel. I let it set for 2-3 hours - if there's any crack/opening between the two pieces I fill with Elmer's wood filler. And later sand it to suit.

8) Most of the time I need to use my wood chisels and sand paper to make the joint appear united.

I hope that helps.

-neb
 

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Many thanks for the great tutorial! I am always challenged to get the hanger bolts or whatever installed so that the joined piece is aligned extremely well.
 

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I think getting the handle or topper lined up with the shank is something we all struggle with.

I cheat.

I use epoxy to glue the rod in place. Epoxy is strong and has great gap filling properties. I drill my holes slightly oversize and rely on the epoxy to fill the gap between the rod and the surrounding wood. I clamp the handle to the shank. This method allows me to be a little off on my drilling and still get a good joint where the handle meets the shank.

You still have to pay attention to the joint between the handle and shank so they meet up well. Otherwise you'll either have a gap or a dark line of epoxy showing.

Rodney
 

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to prevent a gap showing or if you have to open up the drill hole more you can always fill it with epoxy putty as long as you dont allow it to squeeze out it works great .if you allow it to squeeze out its a awful blue colour. But it does fill a oversize drill hole well and strong if its doesn't work then when its dry you can redrill it
 

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I think you did very well with that handle. As was said, your fit was perfect It seems that your not really in love with this stick. What does it need for you?
I try for contrast. You have contrast between the handle and the bark. You could stain one part or the other darker. Another thing is to put some shims of different woods in the joint.
 

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Good looking stick, well done sir.

TIP - With ref to joints, looking at one of our members sticks last week and he had a thin white spacer at the joint it looked good due to its thinness,

He told me it was made from an old "credit card", now that's a good recycling tip.
 
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