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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which do you prefer? I'm not talking so much animal heads etc but rather carving designs into say a cardigan pattern handle. I would imagine both have their advantages but what is your experiences?
 

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I sometimes texture the grip of the handle. I have done a basket weave and fish scale disigns on handles. But if it is going to be a daily user. A natural or smooth handle is my choice. Dirt and grime from the hand build up fast in the carvings and can de hard to clean.
 

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I like to see animal/water fowl heads incorporated into cardigan sticks ,it makes the stick very individual .I haven't had a problem cleaning them , but I have only carved them for other people and don't use them .

A nice cardigan stick with a feature on .with a buffalo horn collar and end piece looks great and my preference would be for this style but I have English taste.. Where as American s tend to go more for folk art its just a matter of taste
 

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Hi Lol999, agree with CV3 if the design is actually being carved into the grip area, adding the carving to the front of he handle as Cobalt is saying, or as an addition on the back area of the handle.the size of the carving tends to dictate which tooling to use, its not often that I resort to chisel and mallet, unless faced with a hard knotty area, mainly use knife, palm chisel and power (as time goes on power is the King).
 

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Once the blank is cut on the band saw I tend to use chisels for roughing out , then add as much detail with the fine chisels and v tool if needed then finish with a knife and power tool.

The worst of the power tool is it creates so much dust in the workshop . on your clothes even tho i use a leather apron .then forget to clean the shoes until the boss comes along and spots the dust marks on the floor, after all this time i still do it, habit forming

but I hardly ever carve into the shank as I leave the bark on and have never used para cord , which I suspect would be a area that's difficult to clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just have a yen to do some plain handles, cardigan pattern or derby, and do some carving in the sides of the handles. Sounds like at least 1 palm gouge, perhaps a 3mm v or u tool may be useful from talking to a chap at carving club.
 

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Either will work good I would suggest that you draw out you design on some similar scrap before you work on your handle. It will give you a idea where you may have some issues with the wood or the use of the tool.
 

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once you cut the pattern out for a cardigan stick good wood rasp will quickly shape it. a few burrs to fit into your flexi tool will quickly cut a shallow pattern into it without much problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Lol999, agree with CV3 if the design is actually being carved into the grip area, adding the carving to the front of he handle as Cobalt is saying, or as an addition on the back area of the handle.the size of the carving tends to dictate which tooling to use, its not often that I resort to chisel and mallet, unless faced with a hard knotty area, mainly use knife, palm chisel and power (as time goes on power is the King).
Any suggestions on the most used size and profiles of palm tools you use?
 

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If youe putting a shallow design on the stick mayby you should just use the power tool.There are a wide range of burrs available. It depends what type of tools you have at hand ,even a knife will do the trick. At this stage there is no need to rush to buy tools. go to a flea market. Usually there's loads of good quality tools going at very reasonable prices.
 

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The palm tools I use are "flexcut", never had a problem with them. They can be bought individually or in sets - I started with the 11 piece set and are still frequently using it and never added to it, covers everything I need for "in hand" carving toppers.
 

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Hi Lol999, agree with CV3 if the design is actually being carved into the grip area, adding the carving to the front of he handle as Cobalt is saying, or as an addition on the back area of the handle.the size of the carving tends to dictate which tooling to use, its not often that I resort to chisel and mallet, unless faced with a hard knotty area, mainly use knife, palm chisel and power (as time goes on power is the King).
Any suggestions on the most used size and profiles of palm tools you use?

Flex cut palm tools are good tools .I used them for years. Sizes are much a question of what you are going to carve. Flex cut has a 5 piece beginners set that will serve you well. You had t said you would like to do design in your handles. For cutting in lines I would choose a #11 - 2 mm or 3 mm u-gouge and/.or a 70 degree 1.5 mm or 2 mm V-tool. I would check with the fellows in your carving club see what they are using. I would also note that sharpening the smaller mico tools( 2mm and lower) take some practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well today I had a hold of some palm tools and to be honest they are too small for me. I'm having difficulties with my hands so I think I'll go for the full size tools. Thanks for all the imput.
 
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