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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished this one today. It was a custom order as a birthday gift for the customer's wife. The handle is some really pretty quilted maple that the pictures really don't show well. This stuff has a lot of chatoyance and shimmers like mother of pearl. The cane is a scaled down version of my Fritz style canes.

The shank is straight grained black walnut.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys.

Beautiful Cane Rodney. Do you use one standard template for your handles or do you have more? Do you ever just hand draw templates from scratch by artistic whim?
I made several different templates based on more traditional designs I've seen. I'm constantly tweaking them based on what I'm trying to achieve.
Every now and again I'll try coming up with a new handle design. Most end up as firewood. I've found the traditional designs are traditional for good reasons. They tend to work well.
 

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Is there anything about the handle geometry that is the same about all handles? Maybe something like the main weight bearing portion of the handle being centered over the shaft?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They all have a palm swell. They all tend to be larger at the back than at the front of the cane. They all tend to rise at the back.

I generally make them sized for 3 fingers gripping the handle and the index finger pointing down the shank. It's my personal preference. Sometimes I'll stretch them for 4 fingered grips.

There are exceptions.

I will change things as needed. Some of my market sticks get really thick shanks. Those don't get bigger toward the back.

When I make a cane with a natural handle I work with what I'm given.

Close your hand mostly like you're holding something and look inside. That's the shape I try to come close to on my grips. It doesn't have to be perfect. The hand is very adaptable but the closer you get to that shape the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No, but there's no reason you can't. It's done pretty frequently with different colors of wood for different effects.

One of the best things I can recommend for someone just starting out is to look at sticks on the internet. Check out sites like pinterest and Etsy. Look for blogs on stick making. Along with this site you'll find a lot of inspiration and ideas out there.

Also, got an idea you want to try? Go for it. Sticks really do grow on trees. :lol:

I make a lot of interesting firewood.
 

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It just occurred to me that old butcher block could yield quite a few handles. They are usually maple, teak or walnut. Probably won't find a lot of these just thrown away but damaged ones would probably go free or cheap. Also, Lowes has good oak dowels in various sizes. I know this gets away from the stick hunting mentality but this would be for more finished high end canes that use metal handles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm not sure about the butcher block. Dowels work. The only issues I have with them are the lack of a taper and watch the grain on them. You want it to run straight down the length of it, not out the side.
 

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True, the dowels have no taper but as I mentioned they would be for high end finished canes. Tapering would be done with a lathe, which I'm still on the hunt for. I'm beginning to think I'll either have to hit the lottery or wait until someone dies and wills me one to get it LOL.
 
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