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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to carve some small, say about 1" square silhouettes, perhaps a bit larger, of animals etc. Obviously I want the outline to be as sharp and as true as possible. To achieve such a thing would you recommend a knife or a set of micro chisels? If so, could you name some examples?

Thanks, Lol
 

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I think the answer is "Yes" :) Not trying to be cheeky just that it can boil down to preference.

Chip carvers can use knives to create great sharp detail as well as someone with a v-tool chisel.

It really boils down to muscle memory, grip and pressure and less the tool you use (except that the tool dictates the grip :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I figured it was a matter of choice. To be honest I think I'm heading down the chisel route as they will give me more control, me and knives have a difficult relationship sometimes :)
 

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Maybe it is a cultural thing. The Swiss have a style of carving that uses handsfull- fists full of chisels to do a carving. The Norwegians can do anything with a knife and an axe.
 

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If you are heading down the chisel route and are only doing small hand held carvings Palm chisels ere a good route, as I mianly hand hold I started off with "Flexcut " SK series chisels and Knives these are moderately priced and have had good success with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you are heading down the chisel route and are only doing small hand held carvings Palm chisels ere a good route, as I mianly hand hold I started off with "Flexcut " SK series chisels and Knives these are moderately priced and have had good success with them.
Yeah I've got 3 flexcut knives and have a good time with them, I was looking at their Micro sets, particularly the v and u gouges as they would be good for fine outlining as well as veining etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Maybe it is a cultural thing. The Swiss have a style of carving that uses handsfull- fists full of chisels to do a carving. The Norwegians can do anything with a knife and an axe.
I suspect the Norwegians benefit from some Viking DNA, I have to make do with mongrel English :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@ Gloops - having just checked out the Flexcut 10 piece travel set at about £100 with the flexcut slip strop I reckon I'll use all of them at some point and it's a very good price for 10 chisels.
 

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I have a couple of flex cut knives, and the scraper set. The steel seems to be pretty good. The only down side to the scrapers is that I'm hopelessly disorganized, and am always misplacing the handle. Fortunately the scrapers can be used between thumb and forefinger.

regarding micro gouges and veiners, the ones I have were not very useful. Perhaps I've been unable to properly sharpen something so small. I've found that a really sharp razor knife, such as the X-acto brand, work better for cleaning up cuts. For best detail, engraving burins do a good job. They are very hard, better than steel dental tools, and I've not come across a wood they can't scribe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ain't that the devil of the thing? I've got a carving project in mind for which I wanted the small chisels, but I've just been outside and tried some new burrs, and some existing ones in my new Dremel knock off and they are just the ticket! For someone who likes definites this many ways to the same path business is frustrating!
 
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