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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These can be costly.

Recommendations?
Manufacturers?
Sources?
Sizes?

Lee Valley is reliable for mail order, so far in my experience.
Woodcraft is right here in Tulsa, so I can look before I buy.
Lowes and Home Depot are comparatively less expensive.
 

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Mr. Cheap here :)

I use an old long Kitchen knife to do the task, think narrow K-Bar about 12 inches long. I pull from the backside instead of using handles.

That said, an inexpensive one can be fine.I wouldn't go too wide, but you should feel comfortable As Shawn said in the other post, you draw 'upside down' so as to not go too deep and you have a 'swoop' to your pull. If it isn't working quite right, you should learn how to adjust the bevel to what you need. Really it boils down to preferrence. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I understand. I think I'll go ahead and get one somewhere. The old KA-BAR has that tip sharp as a razor on both sides, and so I can't grip it near the tip. The "blood groove" doesn't need to be tested. ;-)

Thanks!

Mr. Cheap here :)

I use an old long Kitchen knife to do the task, think narrow K-Bar about 12 inches long. I pull from the backside instead of using handles.

That said, an inexpensive one can be fine.I wouldn't go too wide, but you should feel comfortable As Shawn said in the other post, you draw 'upside down' so as to not go too deep and you have a 'swoop' to your pull. If it isn't working quite right, you should learn how to adjust the bevel to what you need. Really it boils down to preferrence. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just bought this at Woodcraft:
pfeil Swiss made Carver's Drawknife

image.jpg

When I learn to use it, I will let you know what I think, but I have no basis for comparison. It will be two weeks before I will have an opportunity to begin learning.
 

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I just bought this at Woodcraft:
pfeil Swiss made Carver's Drawknife
attachicon.gif
image.jpg
When I learn to use it, I will let you know what I think, but I have no basis for comparison. It will be two weeks before I will have an opportunity to begin learning.
Sorry -- I missed this post -- I see you already got one! Let me know how it works out!
 

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Those look to be so nice of a tool. I've been tempted to buy one before but haven't. What do you find it to
be used most for in this hobby?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Those look to be so nice of a tool. I've been tempted to buy one before but haven't. What do you find it to
be used most for in this hobby?
Sean, I'm just learning and I will probably do many things the hard way. I won't purchase a lathe in the near future as I need that cash for some other endeavors. I have been whittling my sticks with my old KA-BAR knife, but the tip is very sharp on both sides and I can't use both hands. I plan to use the draw knife to shave wood and reduce the diameter of my sticks. It will be interesting to see how different woods respond to a blade. As others have noted, the KA-BAR knife can catch a sliver or a knot and cause a gouge that has to be dealt with. The draw knife may work the same way. So far, I have been able to smooth out the gouges.

I haven't yet found a suitable wood vise. As a last resort, I can use a portable (rock) core rack to clamp a stick onto, until I find a vise.

Progress reports will follow, when I have the time to experiment.
 

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Sean drawknives are used as spokeshaves to remove bark and round off square edges. Wider grip and pulling motion makes it easier than pushing with knives and chisels.
 

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Mine are all old ones, so can't say from personal experience about newer ones. But If I were to buy a new one, the one you bought is nice. I've also had very good luck and been impressed with the quality of Lee Valley's Veritas line of tools.

The key things to remember about draw knives are:
1. As with all woodworking tools except a froe, sharp is important
2. Remember to use it bevel down. In other words, the bevel should be face down on the wood. Tis gives you better control over the depth of the cut.
3. Whenever possible, draw up the tree, not down it. Grain on most kinds of wood have a direction. If you start to draw your knife toward the base of the tree, you're more likely to get your blade into the grain and raise more than you want. When you have a board or a sawn piece, it's easier to read the grain and avoid this. But when you have a stick, then use the direction the tree grew in to help you. If you have to cut down towards the roots, then take very shallow cuts and watch your bevel. For this, a spokeshave works better because it isn't as open and can't dig into the grain like a draw knife.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is one that I use. Don't let the price fool you this is a good quality knife. The biggest difference between prices is the level of finishing on the knife. With a sander some stones and a little elbow grease this is well worth the money.
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/9-inch-straight-drawknife.aspx
Looks a lot like mine. Mine doesn't get a lot of use, but when I use it, the task at hand is much easier than it might have been.
 
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