Walking Stick Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe this is a subject worth discussing from time to time. One of the things new carvers and some of us older ones may not pay enough attention to is dust control. Many woods can be harmful to toxic. As can be bone and antler dust. Safety measures as simple as a dust mask can save you a tip to the doctor or stay in the hospital.
You can make a very simple, cheap and effective air filter with a 20" box fan, a 20" home air filter and a couple of bungee cords. Just strap filter to the back of the fan set it in front of you. I found a washable filter was best saved money on buying filters. Google box fan woodworking filters there are many plans and ideas. I sat in front of one for years when sanding or working with my dermal tool or Foredom tool, as well as wearing a mask.
Back when I started carving I was working with a piece of 8"x 8"old growth oak timber that had come out of an old barn. It was a beautiful piece of wood. I was nonchalant about wearing a mask and just did not take the time to put one on. I had work with oak be for and had not had any issues with it. Three days later I was very sick and headed to the hospital. Turn out that the wood had a lot of old chemicals in it from all thoughts years in a barn. It did not bother the skin but the fine dust got in the lungs and real made me sick. So I became a very chausses carver where dust control is concern. Reaction to different woods is different for many people. You can check on a number of wood data sites for information on toxicity of the woods you may be working with. But as a rule all wood dust is not made for our lungs. And it's just not that hard to protect our selves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
Great subject Randy. As a retired member of a dust trade, Heat and Frost Insulators, I should be more cautious with the wood dust issues. I have found myself nonchalantly sanding away till I start sneezing and the nose gets bloody. Pine dust gets me every time. 3M & Moldex (8511 & 8710) make very good dust respirators, washable and have an exhale vent to keep the mask drier for comfort, that go along way to preventing ingestion problems with dust. Have several boxes I procured before I retired, just have to put one on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,170 Posts
I think all of us at one time or another just think i will just quickly sand it a bit and dont bother wearing one

I try to aviod sanding as much as possable but to get that final finish it sometimes has to be done.

that's one reason why I like the Shinto saw rasp so much it doesn't create fine dust and gives a good finish
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
Excellent point, Randy. I ended up with a nasty sinus infection one time after turning a spalted birch bowl.

Seems I remember reading about a turner or woodworker who got a sinus infection so bad the doctors ended up having to literally surgically remove most of his face.

And I agree with Cobalt on the Shinto rasp; it is an amazing tool. If they made a round version that's as good as the flat version, I could throw out half the tools I have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Great topic Randy simple health and safety such as a mask and gloves is very important as the dust can be deadly depending on what wood you are carving from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
907 Posts
Agree a dust mask and or good extractor is a must, my first extractor was (and still in use) is an old DYSON vacuum cleaner and a 4 x 1 piece of timber clamped to the bench with a hole to take the end of the vac hose, when inserted the short rigid upholstery attachment was shoved on to hold in place, I then had something to sit in front of which took 90% of the dust away, I say sit in front but when using power Dremmel etc. the nozzle had to be between my hands and my chest due to burr rotation. as I mentioned this is in constnt use clamp the nozzle in the area where I am working, plug it into bandsaw, table saw, clamp it to the bench drill table when drilling or using a rotary sanding drum - thankyou Mr Dyson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Thanks for brining it up, CV3. I was getting worried after seeing sawdust getting all over (and knowing my lungs would be no exception) so I did a little research and just ordered a cyclonic dust separator (specifically, the "Dust Deputy"). I'll hook that to my shop vac when it arrives and see if I can also rig up something (hood / funnel?) that will catch most of the sawdust as I sand and hopefully not mess with ergonomics too much - but still wear a dust mask.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top