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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I began using a cane back in the seventies. When I started traveling in a motor home, I saw a lot of sticks lying around on the ground and began keeping a lookout for the nicer looking ones. On one of our stops in Louisiana, I met a guy who was using a twisty stick cane. It was really neat looking and, immediately, I wanted one. He explained his cane making technique, pointed me toward the bayou, and explained to me how the vines wrap themselves around the trees and cause the trees to grow over the vines leaving the raised twist. He showed me where to get them, how to debark and prepare the stick, and how to drill and attach the handle. These are some of my early canes made from twisty sticks I found there.

The fifth for one from the left was my personal use cane.

The seventh from the left, the one with the Y fork under the handle, is a stick I found in Texas. I think it's mesquite.
 

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Im always on the look out for twisted sticks I got two drying now that will make nice canes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Very nice. Would you share how you debarked them?
Rodnogdog, Thank you. I used a curved blade knife. It is called the hawksbill and has a hooked blade like a linoleum knife. I found one for a dollar at a flea market in Florida. It was made in Afghanistan and had a bone handle. Unfortunately, the Brass pin became loose and the knife fell apart. Most of my sticks were green so I debarked them right away which made it quite easy. I bundled the sticks which allowed me to straighten the bent ones. Occasionally, I would find a dead stick than had been lying on the ground for a while. In that case, I would hose down the stick and then wrap it with a wet towel. After letting it sit the bark would be much easier to remove.
 

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Lovely rustic canes those. Great job. As stated before we just don't see the vine twisted wood you chaps see down
south. If I want a twist I need help from a spindle sander. It complaining though living up here in the Cascade
Mountain range we are pretty lucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lovely rustic canes those. Great job. As stated before we just don't see the vine twisted wood you chaps see down
south. If I want a twist I need help from a spindle sander. It complaining though living up here in the Cascade
Mountain range we are pretty lucky.
Sean, you are indeed very lucky. I've seen those racks of sticks you have drying In your video and it always leaves me green with envy. Also, don't forget, you have access to diamond willow.
 

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All very nice sticks. I still like the one with the Y in it but would be pleased with any of them.

We do have some interesting woods growing here in the cascades. The trick is getting to them. I don't think I've seen any diamond willow near me though there is plenty of willow in low areas. I think you have to be farther north to get it.

Right now I have one leg and am hopping around on crutches. I'm in the process of getting a new leg made and it should be ready soon. I'm hoping after I'm able to walk a bit I can go out and hunt for sticks for real. Right now I'm limited to what I can get to easily-flat, firm ground and not too brushy.

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All very nice sticks. I still like the one with the Y in it but would be pleased with any of them.

We do have some interesting woods growing here in the cascades. The trick is getting to them. I don't think I've seen any diamond willow near me though there is plenty of willow in low areas. I think you have to be farther north to get it.

Right now I have one leg and am hopping around on crutches. I'm in the process of getting a new leg made and it should be ready soon. I'm hoping after I'm able to walk a bit I can go out and hunt for sticks for real. Right now I'm limited to what I can get to easily-flat, firm ground and not too brushy.

Rodney
Hello Rodney, thank you for your posts and for sharing your disability with us. I want to wish you good luck with your new leg. Surely, it will be a whole lot easier getting around than it is now with a crutch. At least you'll be able to get into some less accessible areas of the woods. I don't know what your situation is with your friends and neighbors but I have found that if they find out that I am a woodcarver and stick maker they are always on the lookout for me and, in some cases, give me sticks that they have found.
 
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