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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been collecting and making canes and sticks since my High School days (I won't tell you how long ago that was) -- One of my favorites is the End of Day cane that I inherited from my Great Aunt. Although most of these canes were not actually used -- my great aunt was a very small petit lady and she actually used this cane.

"In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, glassmakers in both the United States and Europe often ended their workday creating a variety of objects from the leftover materials used for making other glasswares. Master craftsman were allowed to "play" with glass on their own time and create objects for their own use, enjoyment, or simply to improve their skills. These "end-of-day" creations, called "Friggers" in England or "glasshouse whimsies" elsewhere, demonstrated their great skill and control over molten glass. A variety of objects were created including chains, sock darners, doorstop turtles, bells, horns, pipes and of course whimsical canes. Given their fragile nature, canes were rarely used for walking, although they were occasionally by Text-Enhance">employed ceremonially in parades. Glass canes are rarely documented to their maker." (quote from Cane Quest)

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Very cool cane. I am always intrigued by glass artists. What a cool keepsake with a story.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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That must occupy a special and prominent place in your home. Beautiful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That must occupy a special and prominent place in your home. Beautiful!
Thanks! But actually our nine year old grandson lives with us and he loves to play with my sticks -- so I keep the End of Day cane tucked away some place safe -- at least for now. He has been with us since he was a baby, so I'm use to keeping things out of reach if you know what I mean?
 

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That is a fantastic piece. Nice story as well enjoyed reading and learning something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is a fantastic piece. Nice story as well enjoyed reading and learning something.
Thank you! My job has caused me to move several times, and it has always been a challenge to move things like this cane and keep them all in one piece!
 

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Hopefully it is deleted (the apparent SPAM). I didn't delete the person. Yet. I'm on my iPhone in the woods about 10 miles from Fairfield, TX. Back home on Monday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hopefully it is deleted (the apparent SPAM). I didn't delete the person. Yet. I'm on my iPhone in the woods about 10 miles from Fairfield, TX. Back home on Monday.
I envy your trip to the woods -- it's down right cold here today!
 

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Have been searching through my glass dictionarys for some referance to the glass cane for some time but none found .But its likley that it was made by a apprentice finishing of his traing.This was standard way at one time .they made anything from bowler hats kettles etc.It was a compulsary thing to show the master glass maker his skills

.its a nice twist and a long one would have taken quite a lot of skill in the twist and manipulating the length of the glass Also the annelling would have been difficult with that lengh.Not many apprentice pieces survive and are oftern sort after for a curio.Also the red colour is very good at one time to get a real vibrant red you had to mix gold into the pigment.The twist sems pretty consistant and is very difficult to achieve a consistant thread as long as that so its a great piece from days gone bye

I have been collecting and making canes and sticks since my High School days (I won't tell you how long ago that was) -- One of my favorites is the End of Day cane that I inherited from my Great Aunt. Although most of these canes were not actually used -- my great aunt was a very small petit lady and she actually used this cane.

"In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, glassmakers in both the United States and Europe often ended their workday creating a variety of objects from the leftover materials used for making other glasswares. Master craftsman were allowed to "play" with glass on their own time and create objects for their own use, enjoyment, or simply to improve their skills. These "end-of-day" creations, called "Friggers" in England or "glasshouse whimsies" elsewhere, demonstrated their great skill and control over molten glass. A variety of objects were created including chains, sock darners, doorstop turtles, bells, horns, pipes and of course whimsical canes. Given their fragile nature, canes were rarely used for walking, although they were occasionally by Text-Enhance">employed ceremonially in parades. Glass canes are rarely documented to their maker." (quote from Cane Quest)

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End of Day 2.JPG
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End of Day 1.JPG
 

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That is really different. I had never seen a glass cane. I was thinking when I saw it was acrylic. I know you are proud to have it in you collection.
 
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