Walking Stick Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Consider this thread a "branch" of one going on now under carving. Member cobalt uses lots of lime wood, aka linden (Tilia x europaea) for his stick "toppers." This wood has long been known as a most desirable for carving.

When I was younger, I encountered this wood, or perhaps a variant, being used as the base for wood print blocks. Very easy to carve, capable of taking good detail, but so soft that lines often broke down after as few as 25 prints.

One of the first walking sticks I made a few years ago was made from basswood, aka American linden, aka lime (Tilia americana.) It was for my wife, who did not like the weight of the beech and oak sticks I had made. I obliged her desire for a very lightweight stick, but told her I was dubious about its strength.

Recently, I was doing research on woods for stick making and carving, and found something that surprised me. European lime has a Janka hardness rating around 700, but American linden only 400. That is a pretty large difference for something that in everyday language is often given the same name. I was surprised to find how much harder European lime is, and that it would most likely wear better than either the sassafras or yellow poplar I have used for some sticks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Very interesting, I haven't ever used it for a cane, as you said, it seemed very light for that. Good to know, thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,170 Posts
Consider this thread a "branch" of one going on now under carving. Member cobalt uses lots of lime wood, aka linden (Tilia x europaea) for his stick "toppers." This wood has long been known as a most desirable for carving.

When I was younger, I encountered this wood, or perhaps a variant, being used as the base for wood print blocks. Very easy to carve, capable of taking good detail, but so soft that lines often broke down after as few as 25 prints.

One of the first walking sticks I made a few years ago was made from basswood, aka American linden, aka lime (Tilia americana.) It was for my wife, who did not like the weight of the beech and oak sticks I had made. I obliged her desire for a very lightweight stick, but told her I was dubious about its strength.

Recently, I was doing research on woods for stick making and carving, and found something that surprised me. European lime has a Janka hardness rating around 700, but American linden only 400. That is a pretty large difference for something that in everyday language is often given the same name. I was surprised to find how much harder European lime is, and that it would most likely wear better than either the sassafras or yellow poplar I have used for some sticks.
thats news to me .i was underthe impression that they where the same?

I like you dont think that the wood would make a good stick so you suprised me , have to agree that a lot of hardwoods are to heavy for a hiking pole and find the standard shanks well suited

So suprised you found it suitable for a stick would have never considered it for stickmaking shank ? but once tried and it works well perhaps i need to look at it in a different light ,Still think the wood lacks character

always pick up something worth remebering thanks
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top