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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
got to agree about carving facial features it is one of the best ways to learn to carve ,theres no doubt about that. Its hands and feet i struggle with most

The other differance as CV3 has said ,one of the main features of your market is that any feature is normally caved directly onto the shank.,again a poular idea there,

On a personal level i would find working on that idea a bit limiting and to me seems out of balance, working on such a small scale is also limiting .just personel taste

I use lime wood which carves very well with hand tools not so good for the flexi shaft as power tools leave a fuzz on the wood and better suited for harder woods its similar to your bass wood .But a diamond burr works well .

I am trying to find a supplier of some thin woods like American walnut and maple to try laminating these together for crooks etc. the different colours should enhance the looks of it. Basically I need a planer and a large circular saw to do it myself but cant justify the cost for small amount of time I would use them, cutting it down be hand is a job from 6inch square to the right thickness
 

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got to agree about carving facial features it is one of the best ways to learn to carve ,theres no doubt about that. Its hands and feet i struggle with most

The other differance as CV3 has said ,one of the main features of your market is that any feature is normally caved directly onto the shank.,again a poular idea there,

On a personal level i would find working on that idea a bit limiting and to me seems out of balance, working on such a small scale is also limiting .just personel taste

I use lime wood which carves very well with hand tools not so good for the flexi shaft as power tools leave a fuzz on the wood and better suited for harder woods its similar to your bass wood .But a diamond burr works well .

I am trying to find a supplier of some thin woods like American walnut and maple to try laminating these together for crooks etc. the different colours should enhance the looks of it. Basically I need a planer and a large circular saw to do it myself but cant justify the cost for small amount of time I would use them, cutting it down be hand is a job from 6inch square to the right thickness
International wood shipments can be very expensive. All the wood must be heat and pressure treated in an inspected facility before the wood can travel. Last week I put together a futon frame fabricated in California, but made of "official" Indonesian lumber, i.e. certified treated.

Something you might consider. Veneers might be far less expensive, and easier to come by. Perhaps face some baltic birch plywood. The birch itself can be quite beautiful, and the "baltic" variety does not have the gaps and voids often found in common plywood grades. The grain is very tight, and can easily be shaped by sanding. All you would need is a scroll saw to shape the plywood, and the veneer might be easy enough to cut w. scissors. Craft blades certainly work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I had look at some ply .it probably would give extra strength to a handle but I would like to use a blend of real wood sandwiched between some spaletd birch with your American mahogany in with it.

All imported wood here also have to be certified as well it dose prevent diseases from spreading and you right about it being expensiv.

just going of the beaten track a bit,

I have ben given some American whiskey ,bit dubious about it at first but well impressed with it .Its called" tin cup" made in Colorado, slight almond taste very subtle

2% stronger than my norm but will keep a eye out for it in future but prefer it to Irish whiskey .would recommend it
 

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I was going to suggest veneers too. I know here in the states you can buy small lots of veneer on Ebay. It's probably the same for you there. It is very useful for accent rings, things of that nature.

Perhaps you're right about the condition of the trails there. I've never been to England so speculation on my part. I know a thicker staff feels better in my hands than a thinner one. I don't like to feel a lot of flex in a stick when I'm using it to support myself. I know I'm impressed with how strong hazel is-even when green. I picked my first hazel blank while picking mushrooms one day in some fairly rough terrain. Hilly, brushy and no trails. The stick took a lot of abuse and held up well.

I do have a nice straight ash blank long enough for a hiking pole that's fairly thin, about 1 1/4" at the thick end. I picked it last summer and think it's probably dry enough to work with now. It weighs probably half it's green weight. Maybe I'll make a thinner staff and see what I think.

No topper though unless it's something simple like a turned knob. No point in messing up a good stick with a bad carving. :)

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
the flex isn't particularly noticeable it just acts in the same way as a sailing mast it gives slightly and takes shocks etc. but you wouldn't particularly notice it bend

Ash is a good material for a walking stick and there used here . I do have some not particularly my favourite not keen on the grey greenish colour of the bark..You don't have to remove the bark it will be okay.
 

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I had look at some ply .it probably would give extra strength to a handle but I would like to use a blend of real wood sandwiched between some spaletd birch with your American mahogany in with it.

All imported wood here also have to be certified as well it dose prevent diseases from spreading and you right about it being expensiv.

just going of the beaten track a bit,

I have ben given some American whiskey ,bit dubious about it at first but well impressed with it .Its called" tin cup" made in Colorado, slight almond taste very subtle

2% stronger than my norm but will keep a eye out for it in future but prefer it to Irish whiskey .would recommend it
There is something of a whiskey re-birth here. Probably related to the great swell of craft beer brewing. There are 3 new distilleries near where I live, one of which, Journeyman, has gained a good reputation. I'm not big on whiskey, but I'm told I need to make a tour of the place if for nothing else but the building, which used to be a corset stay and buggy whip factory. But they will need a few decades yet for fine barrel aged liquor.
 

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There is another stick used by hunters called a shooting stick. Is this the same thing as a thumb stick?
Hi, a shooting stick over here at least is a short, usually aluminium shank, with usually some sort of folding platform on top, generally with leather straps inbetween. it is used to sit on whilst shooting waiting for the beaters to drive the birds over towards the guns. I am sure I can find a photo somewhere. N.
 

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There is another stick used by hunters called a shooting stick. Is this the same thing as a thumb stick?
Hi, a shooting stick over here at least is a short, usually aluminium shank, with usually some sort of folding platform on top, generally with leather straps inbetween. it is used to sit on whilst shooting waiting for the beaters to drive the birds over towards the guns. I am sure I can find a photo somewhere. N.
This is the sort of thing I was trying to describe Lily's Dad; Tool Bicycle part Nickel Metal Fashion accessory
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Some people just use a thumb stick.Generally speaking a shooting stick in the past just had a seat., but the modern versions have all sorts of gizmos on them oftern 3 leg adjust made from aliminum
 

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No, the stick I'm referring to is used by a person who would otherwise shoot off hand. It is a stick of the aproppriate length which is propped on the ground, the off hand held at the upper end and the forearm of the firearm balanced on top. This serves to stabilize the rifle when taking a shot.
 

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Regardless so size isn't a issue its people perception of what is needed
This is true, cobalt. Growing up around a lot of conifers and weaker hardwoods (pine, poplar and plain maple) I would've never trusted a stick thinner than 1'' diameter. Shanks with the bark on are also seen as unfinished and prone to decomposition.

Now that I know there are plenty of local hardwoods suitable for skinny shanks (stronger maples, beaked hazel, etc.) I mostly use those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I see this subject has raised its head again.

Shanks and there uses is a interesting subject some good decorative staffs are used by the clergy for ceremony purposes .Made from a variety of woods.

I have a hawthorn shank ready for use its the only one I have stripped the bark off , not what I am going to do with it yet its only about 3/4 inch in diameter .Had it stripped about a year now .Its a sound and light in colour
 

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The best "Skinny shank" material and a firm favourite in the UK is Blackthorn ( and its berries are used to make Slo Gin ) and is definitely a "Bark on " shank.
I've actually seen quite a few antique shillelaghs and some modern ones that are made more for martial arts that have the bark off. It seems the bark was taken off to prevent it from being chipped and blemished during fights and personally I think the dark red under bark looks much better. But you're right, for the combination of strength and lightness the blackthorn can't be beat!
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
A new request bit of a new one for me a African elephant but painted as a Indian elephant its some sort of Indian elephant festival.but wants the trunk curled outwards ?

not sure if I want to tackle it

I have the same book as CV3 used on his elephant to use as a guide but think I will end up drawing it and changing the transition if I decide to do it .

I think its form will be subject to damage in the shape she wants?

Its for my daughter she walked in as I was doodling as I was after making myself a few interchangeable toppers a dodo as the one I use as my avatar isn't very good also a pelican and a red kite along with a griffin .

as the croquet season its about over its time to get back into the workshop
 

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Wow! Those are just doodles? Anywys.. The trunk curved upwards is a sign of luck or good fortune. Might be a bit delicate for a stick. Unless you kept it "attached" to the head and just had maybe the tip curl out? Not sure how that would look though.
 

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Most American stickmakers mainly carve wood spirits usually quite similar in style and form .
And all Chinese food tastes the same, unlike 'our' fine and varied cuisine...

I, living in America, have found the palette to be as wide ranging and diverse as the artists who carve them anywhere!

In any culture, you will find a majority of 'makers' rather uncreative 'followers'! They/We provide a sort of 'drone', highlighting the creative carvings.

All together creating quite the symphony.

But accusing a culture of nothing but 'drones' seems a bit shortsighted and 'self-serving'.

You are welcome to peruse some that I have made, in relation to your comment.

http://s2.photobucket.com/user/Beelzebubba101/library/?sort=6&page=0

peace
 
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