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Considering the hardness of the wood, save some of the thorns. Put them in a frame, and when someone asks what they are from, you can recount the tale of the mighty struggle it put up when you tried to take it down. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice Utility guys deadened their chainsaws on this monster to keep clear the power lines on my way to work. Saw it and had to have it. Pulled into a driveway across the street from it. Grabbed it and dropped it in my trunk. It was bigger than I thought and soooolid. hard to tell from the pics, but it is a very nice yellow orange.

16 inch ruler for scale... Now I have to figure out what to do with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They had already taken all the branches and mulched them before I could get there
 

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Treat the ends quick! They will most deffinately check and split! Do you have a lathe? It would make great bowl stock!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No I don't need another hobby :)
Thinking about making some lumber blocks from it and lay them out to dry
 

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nice chunky save them for something special

.I have also sbout 6 pieces of apple wood about the same size ,I to was wondering what to do with them ,think a couple of large gargoyles may be on the cards,

I havnt treated the apple ends there are some signs of splitting but will carve it and treat it after if it cracks it will give it some character just getting the time to do it . Where does all the time go? i dont work so i keep saying but always have jobs to do? There isnt enough daylight hours yet , apart from partys people keep asking me to and dancing with my better half and the art groups i go to now been involved with The University of the third age. A self taught group some 300 memebers in this local branch with about 50 different activities going on, wife membership organiser and been volutered for some jobs? my excuse is i am to busy, it dosnt work still get the job ahhh so is life

at best it keeps me fit and active
 

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just about my evening dose < the usual grants whiskey and stones ginger wine and to post some pics i have come across
 

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Some of the wood you get over there is new to me or called by a diffrent name but always wonder what it carves like must see if i can get a translation or the latin names for them .I must have seen them but a good carving wood with anice grain is brilliant, still think lime carves the best but lacks character
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maclura_pomifera

definitely NOT a carving wood, but great for handles, shapes, inlays, etc.

It has the highest BTU of any american hardwood which should tell you it's hardness as well :) I do have a chunk of basswood(lime) curing too from a felled tree of a neighbor and are a great wood for carving.
 

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well thanks for that i`m just downright nosey . Just recieved a book today on cigar box guitars interesting .Still have to focus on whats need to be done and what i want to do? usually end up doing what i want , no self dfisciplin
 

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Some of the wood you get over there is new to me or called by a diffrent name but always wonder what it carves like must see if i can get a translation or the latin names for them .I must have seen them but a good carving wood with anice grain is brilliant, still think lime carves the best but lacks character
This is:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maclura_pomifera

definitely NOT a carving wood, but great for handles, shapes, inlays, etc.

It has the highest BTU of any american hardwood which should tell you it's hardness as well :) I do have a chunk of basswood(lime) curing too from a felled tree of a neighbor and are a great wood for carving.
Not likely to find any osage orange in Britain, outside of botanical gardens. Its original range was in a portion of Oklahoma and Texas. Early on, it was used over much of the Eastern US for farm hedges, much like hawthorn in England. Now, it is often considered a nuisance. Very difficult to get rid of once established, and a lot of people don't like the large, inedible fruits they drop, which have a strong odor. Aside from fence posts, the wood was also used for axe and hammer handles. My sculptor's mallet is osage orange.

The first wood carving I ever did was out of osage orange. A friend who knew I had enrolled in a sculpture class mentioned that her grandparents has just had a tree cut down, and that there were some logs w. brilliant yellow wood. I took several chunks. I showed one to my professor, w. the sketch of the carving I had in mind for it. He seemed a little puzzled, and asked why I had chosen that particular piece of wood. (He kept a supply of walnut, cherry and maple on hand for his students.) I said I loved the color, and he said go ahead. When it came to mid-term reviews, I had to apologize for not finishing the carving. I swore that I was spending a minimum of an hour a day on it, often 2, but wasn't getting anywhere. The prof. had a sense of humor, and chuckled. "Well, you know, that's the wood your mallet is made out of."

So, having "cut my teeth" on osage, I think its fine for carving. Pretty much anything I've come across seems easy by comparison.
 

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I grew up doing farm work in southwest Oklahoma, including the building of miles of fence. The typical fence posts were eastern red cedar, but occasionally, Osage Orange, aka Bois D'Arc posts were used. The latter, when completely dried, was hard enough to bend a steel steeple if you didn't drive it in perfectly straight. Those posts would last many years.

I have several Bois D'Arc sticks in various stages of progress. This is strange wood to me, a novice at this. My sticks were purchased from a supplier to bow makers. They have supposedly been kiln dried, but they still have a yellow tint, unlike the completely dried gray posts that I once used for building fence. The draw knife must be used with great care to prevent digging into the wood. At an early stage, the grain seems far to coarse for carving. But once the sanding is underway, a transformation seems to occur. Suddenly the wood seems fine textured. I haven't progressed far enough to see how this would carve after sanding. This is a very interesting wood to work with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
(He kept a supply of walnut, cherry and maple on hand for his students.) I
These aren't much better :) If you can find a piece of basswood, after carving hardwoods, it is like butter. I like hardwoods myself, but its work
 

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yes harwoods are good but the time you need to keep you tools in good nick is a pain.

Friut woods are nice to carve and do have a nice grain to them, but for a lot of detail work i still go for lime if its going to be painted

OAK is a nice wood and when its lime washed after its finished and polished it does hve a nice finish.

So much post here today good job i have been given a bottle of JIM BEAN (christmas pressy)its new to me, of course i have to test it well a couple of times it does help to chill out and a relaxing way to spend some time having it and reading this..

well back to the bourbon nice flavour very different to what i am used to nearly as good as the one i normally sip, would try it again and again and again lol

well only 1 shot a night

talking of hardwood lgna vita is the hardest wood you can get so dense it wont float but there great for wood carvers mallet last a lifetime and beyond

The 1st bobbys or pealers as they used to be called used ligna vita for there truncheons not sure what there made of now .

ligna is difficult to get hold off and can only be obtained from a sustainable forest
 
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