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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Handy tip if using a threaded rod. Drill your hole the same size as your rod, then file a flat all along one side of the rod to let out the air and surplus glue. That way you don't get a piston effect when you glue up.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Handy tip if using threaded rod. When you joint up, get the handle joint as flat as possible using a flat surface, eg the work bench. Turn it around to see if you are happy with the angle, glue in metal rod. Drill out the stick, slightly concave the top of the stick from the drill hole to the bark. Then when you decide on the best position for the head trim away the bark edge that is touching until no day light shows through the joint,

PS Tape the top of stick, mark the handle and the stick with a pencil line, so they always go back in the same place when you are dry fitting.

Dave
 

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Cheers for that, but personally not had any problem, the thread itself will allow pressure to bleed out as it is going into a plain hole rather than a tapped one,

I also use a generous sized countersink to form a reservoir for excess glue (also reduces fitting area to shank) when fitting topper to shank, reduces glue squeeze out at the joint.
 

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Thanks for tip Dave. I will use a dermal tool with a cutting disk to cut a line down the threaded rod. Much like you do cutting a line in along the side of the tenon you carve on the end of you shank..

It does not take much to let the air out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes its just a matter of putting a flat on the side to allow the air to escape, you could put it in the vice and file a length of thread off.dave
 
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