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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in using faux ivory in some of my canes. I have seen three types out there and was wondering if anyone had any experience with any of them. The most expensive is Super Tusk Elforyn, $53/1ft x 1in. followed by standard Elforyn, $42/1ft x 1in. both available from Atlas Billiard Supply (cue making supplies). The third is Arvorin Plus available from Amazon. The Arvorin is the least expensive at $29/1ft x 1in. but is rumored to be so close to real ivory that the Chinese importers were worried that it might not get through customs.

Anyone ever use any of these?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Supposedly all three will cut, sand and turn just like real ivory. The most expensive one (Super Tusk Elforyn) says it will give you the same hit/feel as ivory when used in a pool cue on the ferrule. Since that isn't a concern for us here, any one of them could be a good choice. I ordered a 1ft x 1in rod of the cheaper Arvorin to try out. I'll post my results when I can but the expected delivery date from China is about a month. It costs $29 but if you use 1 1/2 inches on each cane the rod will net 8 spacers. If you use them as washer thin spacers, even more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So, I got my shipment of Arvorin from China this week. I compared the piece with pictures of real ivory and damned if I can tell the difference. The grain along the surface, the slightly off white color and the cross section grain look almost exactly like the real thing. Supposedly it glows blueish under UV light where as real ivory glows white. Real ivory will also char with a hot needle where this material will melt. Those are the definitive tests for the real thing but unnecessary for my use of it. But if you go by looks alone, I can see why they were worried it wouldn't get through customs when they first created it!

I tried cutting it on a miter saw and it cuts easy but you have to go real slow to prevent chipping. I drilled a center hole and it drills easy too. Sort of like hard chalk. The grain goes lengthwise throughout the piece like real ivory (not just on the surface) and will not simply sand off. I just attached the piece to my next cane and I'll be sanding it to size when the epoxy is fully cured. I'll report back on how that went soon. I also spoke with the guys from Treeline about using their inlay material on faux ivory since you have to use generic crazy glue and they said it would work fine. So in the future I might do some ivory with inlay added.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sanding the shaft and "ivory" is done and went as easily as sanding wood alone. 180 grit paper for shaping cut into the "ivory" just about the same as the oak shaft and leveled the shaft and "ivory" evenly very easily. After staining the cane I applied Formbys tung oil to the wood and faux ivory. Since the faux ivory is actually a polymer it does not absorb the oil. It does get a slightly glossy finish, The cane should be done in less than a week depending on how much free time I have this week. Just needs another coat of tung oil, a final polish and attaching the brass handle. The handle style I'll leave a secret until the reveal. I'll post the finished cane in another topic post.

BTW, I keep writing faux ivory or putting ivory in quotation marks because I don't need the World Wildlife Fund banging on my door for illegal ivory! LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's great stuff but not cheap. It adds about $2.50/inch in material cost to the cane. Figure on double that for retail adding $5/inch for customers.
 

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Have you ever considered using bone? I have used it many time when making knife scales,once buffed its hard to tell the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have considered bone because here in hunting country I have unlimited access to it. But it would have to be cleaned, whitened and shaped first. "Free" might end up costing me more money and time than the faux ivory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very nice work. As of this time I don't have a band saw or sander to create the parts I need out of bone. I don't even have a lathe to round it. Cutting length, and sanding to correct finished size is all I can do right now That is going to change very soon though. My friend and I just scored a late model Shopsmith with the lathe with some simple tools, band saw, scroll saw, table saw, belt and disc sanders all in near mint condition for $400!!! Normally a setup like that would run between $1500-1800. Seller is another friend who got it real cheap but doesn't have the time to use it much.
 

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Very nice work. As of this time I don't have a band saw or sander to create the parts I need out of bone. I don't even have a lathe to round it. Cutting length, and sanding to correct finished size is all I can do right now That is going to change very soon though. My friend and I just scored a late model Shopsmith with the lathe with some simple tools, band saw, scroll saw, table saw, belt and disc sanders all in near mint condition for $400!!! Normally a setup like that would run between $1500-1800. Seller is another friend who got it real cheap but doesn't have the time to use it much.
Sweet Deal! I have been looking for one to, but they are so dam expensive.
 

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Sweet deal with that many accessories. Shopsmith still provides excellent support for most of their machines, even the early models. Parts and accessories are easily available. Ebay is also generally a good source for parts.

I have a green Mark V from either 1953 or 54 that's still going strong. I mostly use it as a drill press these days. I also like the ability to set it up for horizontal boring. The disc sander option is really nice too. I expect your bandsaw will be getting a workout as well.

Ken you can do a lot with a couple decent files and rasps for shaping handles. That's what I use on mine. The bandsaw is for roughing them out. A block plane is nice to have for shanks.

Also you might want to keep your eyes open for a good deal on a 1" belt sander. I know I am.
 

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I love this material...

I was asked to turn two new imitation ivory handles for an antique gold bowl. I used Elforyn Super Tusk for the material. These handles are only 1.115" in length, and I knew they were going to be difficult to turn on my 9" lathe. After drilling the holes in the turned-down rods, I used 4-40 threaded rod and secured the blanks with matching hunts. In order to keep the rod from spinning out of control, I drilled a hole in hardwood the same diameter as the rod and mounted it in my tail stock. One more thing: since my tool rest was too long to fit in such a small space, I cut a thick piece of aluminum that would make the perfect size table to rest my cutting tools. Pictured is the original ivory handle in front of the reproduction. The final image displays the ivory-style grain in the Super Tusk.
 

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