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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious about what the average height should be for a walking stick. At first I started with a stick equal to my own height, but I didn't like the top of it waving around at eye level. I cut it to shoulder height and I'm pretty happy with that for myself. I'll probably be making a couple as gifts, and maybe to sell, so not sure how to measure for height....

Thanks
 

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Really it's subjective to the person.

People like hiking sticks from cane height to shoulder height to ear height to head height.

It can also depend on the type of hiking/walking they do, If it is flat even ground, any would do, if there are rocks and hills taller ones work to assist with leverage.

Now there is a form of standard for where you hold a stick (again can be subjective), I tell people to pull their arms against their sides and raise their forearm to make a right angle, then raise it another 15 degrees. For gifts you can make them taller and modify to suit. Usually for selling, I make them to fit me (6') which is average.
 

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Depends some on the use. I have made a couple of "canes" for myself. (Member Cobalt from England says there 'cane' is only used for sticks made from cane.) These are a little bit longer than the standard size, which is described as being in the range of height from the crotch between the thumb and forefinger is when the arm is relaxed at the side, to mid wrist. For hiking, I use shoulder height length so I can push away brambles at a distance, or make my way down an embankment.

I have a few for when I want to be a junior Gandalf. Those are head tall.
 

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of thumb here is a hiking pole should be approx the hieght of the armpit, a walking stck to the hieght of the wrist when the arms are straight down and a thumb stick between the armpit and the elbow,

but there is no hard and fast rule .

The taller the stick the more difficult it is to transport in the car. its just personel taste .

its like the diameter of the stick ,everyone likes a different one, most here are about 1 - 1.5 inches , but a lot of people like thicker ones. but a 1inch one will support the average person well.

The taller sticks i find annoying getting in the way of your eyeline.
 

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With hiking/walking staff It is my experience that it is best to start with a long staff. I try to start with 56" to 58" staffs. In this way I can fit most sticks to the person. We are all a bit different. The angle of our grips on a stick are not always the same. When you hold your fore arm at 90 degrees to your body your grip angle is usually not 90 degree to your fore arm. You have to move your hand up on the stick to a point where you grip it without bending your wrist back behind your thumb. If I am sending a stick I ask that the person hold a long broom handle or pipe in what is a comfortable grip and have some one measure form the bottom of the hand to the floor.
 

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I like my sticks to be shoulder height for hiking. I have some shorter for city walking and the ones I make for others I make about 60" with a removable rubber tip that the new owner can remove to cut the stick to size.
 

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To us a cane is made from bambo lots of walking sticks are made from it but we would call it a cane and not a walking stick, just terminology.A walking stick is what you would call a cane to us. but now that you mention it i have never seen a hiking pole made from bambo wich is odd as itsa strong materaI ? and it would offer a lot of possabiliteis for decorating due to its colour perhaps the thickness would need to be thicker due to the nature of the material.to small a diameter would flex to much perhaps?.and what would you describe as a hiking pole a stick without a handle on? or a stick that is larger than waist high?

Depends some on the use. I have made a couple of "canes" for myself. (Member Cobalt from England says there 'cane' is only used for sticks made from cane.) These are a little bit longer than the standard size, which is described as being in the range of height from the crotch between the thumb and forefinger is when the arm is relaxed at the side, to mid wrist. For hiking, I use shoulder height length so I can push away brambles at a distance, or make my way down an embankment.

I have a few for when I want to be a junior Gandalf. Those are head tall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the input. I'm probably just over thinking things.
 

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Just use what you think you need to do but post some pics.

The shank will allow for any type of decoration you want from a carved shank to a seperate topper the ideas are limitless.
 

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I can't get the quote/multiquote to work.

In response to Cobalt's remarks about bamboo, Doesn't bamboo eventually split between the nodes?
 

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I was just referring to what you call a cane . we know canes as a bamboo and wouldn't refer to them as canes unless it is made from bamboo.? we would just call them walking sticks with mostly made from hazel shanks with the bark left on

The English would call stick as

a general walking aid we would call a walking stick which would be measured from the wrist to floor.

A hiking pole would be measured approx. from the armpit to floor which would include the topper

A thumb stick would be approx. slightly above elbow height, to floor

theses re just general measurements

The hiking poles you use over the pond tend to be slightly taller in height and generally thicker in diameter

in general our hiking poles have a carved topper on or one made from rams horn or water buffalo horn. We don't generally carve wood spirits here mostly waterfowl, dogs or animals heads

this is just general there is always exceptions to the rule
 
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