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I just signed up here. I'm a low-end amateur woodcarver wannabe (emphasis on "wannabe") and never did a walking stick, but I've thought about trying to do one.

This coming winter might be when that happens (?).
 

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Welcome, and let me say "TURN BACK NOW"..ok that was your warning :)

Now Grab a knife and a stick and cut it, now cut it again, don't cut your finger :)

Seriously, once you sit down and just start, it will come. Read up and then try it out

*legal warning, the above instructor cannot be held liable for any damages caused by mishandling of wood or steel devices*
 

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Howdy,

I think you will enjoy doing stick work.

When I started making sticks a few years ago, it was the first time in at least 20 years that i had done any carving. I'm still re-learning a lot, but the main thing I've noticed is that stick carving is more exacting because of the smallish size. A small slip can make a big flaw in a surface no more than 1.5" wide. Previously, most of what I did was w. chisels, gouges under a mallet. Palm tools were only for finishing. Now, most everything is knives, palm tools, and rasps.

Here's something else I've noticed as a difference. Finishing was never much of an issue. The carvings would hopefully never be exposed to the elements. I'm learning a lot about waterproof finishes.

The wood I usually carved was considerably softer than most of what I use for sticks. While I did a few things w. really hard wood, walnut and cherry was usually the hardest. While I always tried to keep my edges sharp, woods like oak require frequent sharpening. Right now, I'm slowly working on some hornbeam, and the cuts I make are largely limited to what i can make w. gouges no more than 1/4" wide. And diamond rasps and files.

Look forward to seeing some of your work.
 
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