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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These two sticks look a lot alike - am uncertain of the specie - just asking does it also appear to you they are perhaps the same specie, stick "b" is older. Both of them have similar "horizontal" markings - going around the branch in similar style.

Any clues, any one?

thanx

-neb
 

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Awfully hard to tell from a small pic of the trees bark.

I went out and looked at some of the pieces I have drying in the garage.

To me it doesn't look like black cherry, red oak, shagbark hickory, lodge pole pine or aspen. Closest pieces I have with similar appearance are silver maple (doubtful) and eastern cottonwood.

I have seen those horizontal bands on the bark of some choke berry bushes I have growing on my property. Maybe that's it?

Mark
 

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1st impression looks like hazel. its hard to tell from such a small pic.have you a picture of the tree it came from ?

It looks like the resin in the wood is red ? is it the photo?

Hazel has a wide range of colours depending on growing conditions and climate

If it is hazel you will have a hard time removing the bark from it., that one of the reasons most psople dont remove it.

need a better photo
 

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"A" looks to be a type of cherry to me, perhaps pin cherry?
 
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My first thought for "A" was pin cherry, but I see that you live a little south of pin cherry natural range, so choke cherry it is.

I've seen "B" but cannot recall at the moment what it might be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
MAJOR FYI - those sticks came from approx 100 miles SW of Nashville, TN.

Does that change anything?
 

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Thanks for the topic norson. I have now discovered that I have been mistakenly calling my shrubby trees choke berry when in fact they are choke cherry! As far as where the wood came from the USDA web site shows it occurs naturally in TN.
 

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It's really hard to accurately identify trees without leaves or at least some kind of bud forming. Call it a cherry of some sort as a best bet for now and if your persistent try and check in the spring/summer.

Sean
 
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Hmm, neither pin or choke cherry have a natural range in Tenn., but both can grow there. At the least, I'd have to say some kind of cherry. My grand mother had a cherry tree in her garden, and I spent many hours staring at its branches when I was little.

The weather is despicable where I am just now, so I spent some time googling around. Branch "B" might be something called "autumn olive." The pictures I find show a similar pattern for the bark, tho' there are not spots of red like in the pic, but rusty brown. It has berries that look a little like small cherries, but are longer, and more olive shaped. Also found in Tenn., but originally from Japan.
 

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A is Definitely a cherry, B...may be also, somtimes older portions of a sapling have a whiter color...not sure
 

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I would say its some sort of cherry , have checked it out against a flowering cherry at friends house and it looks the same
 
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