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Like mark has said you would get a better idea if you could see the leaf.....
Were coming up on warm weather, now. Maybe we could start taking photos of the trees we've been collecting from along with the leaves. These could be kept in a permanent file.
 

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Hello everyone! I am new to this forum and am fairly new to this hobby. What a fantastic hobby to have. I started about six months ago while during a kidney stone altercation. I get at least two a year. Not fun, but it got me started and helped me not think about the pain. Okay lets get to my question. I live in Lancaster, Ohio just a half hour south of Columbus. Ohio has many great trees to make into walking sticks, staffs, canes. The images below I have not been able to identify. this stick has just freshly been cut with wood glue to seal the ends until it cures. Hopefully the picture quality is good enough to determine the species. This tree/shrub that this stick was cut from grows as a cluster ranging from 5 to 8 feet high. The branches do grow off of one small trunk. Most branches extend out and then droop to the ground. Hard to find a really straight stick. At first glace reminds me of a younger osage orange tree without the thorns. The osage orange is pretty abundant in this are as well. I noticed this species about a month ago and after four tries this was the first one that didn't check or crack five minutes after cutting. The other three were very delicate to work with. The split would just get worse. Normally I would just say okay not a good choice and quit cutting them. But for some reason this one intrigues me. The Bark has a grayish, light greenish color with long vertical shallow furrows. It seems very hard and sturdy, heavier than it looks. I know curing will help with that but if anyone has any ideas I would really appreciate it. Thank You!

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Looks like Amur Honeysuckle, a pernicious Asian invasive. We've cleared several from our property in Virginia and I saved the straightest limbs. Haven't tried to work with them yet, but do notice the cracking. Seems pretty strong and bark is interesting but the curving may be hard to overcome and they may not be long-lasting. You might search online for more information, including whether the species has any uses in Asia where it is native. Post your results if useful.
 
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