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Title: An English jack-tar giving monsieur a drubbing
Date Created/Published: [London : Robert Sayer], Publish'd May 1st, 1779.
Medium: 1 print : mezzotint ; 35.8 x 26.3 cm (sheet)
Summary: Cartoon showing English sailor beating French nobleman with walking stick while dog attacks the man's poodle; sign above pub door reads, "Keppel's cordial. Harland's intire"; portrait of Admiral Keppel is the sign for the pub. British war ship "Victory" in background. The "Victory" is associated with the French and British naval battle off Ushant in July 1778. The reference to Keppler is acrimonious, as he was court martialled as the result of his conduct during battle. Harland was Keppel's second in command. Sayer sides with Keppel, who had been set up by Sir Hugh Palliser following the stalemate of a battle. Keppel, who won acquittal without comment, was championed by the common sailors.
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-10736 (digital file from original) LC-USZ62-106912 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: PC 3 - 1779--An English ... (A size) [P&P]
Notes:
Forms part of: British cartoon Prints collection (Library of Congress).
 

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Title: A rocky road and a bad guide / Keppler.
Creator(s): Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956, artist
Date Created/Published: N.Y. : J. Ottmann Lith. Co., Puck Bldg., 1904 May 25.
Medium: 1 photomechanical print : offset, color.
Summary: Illustration shows Alton B. Parker sitting in a chair strapped to the back of David B. Hill, who is carrying him up a narrow, treacherous, rocky trail on the edge of a mountain "to [the] St. Louis Convention". Hill's walking stick has been broken and mended, it is labeled "Trickery" and "Peanut Politics".
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-25852 (digital file from original print)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1904 (Case X) [P&P]
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Notes:
Title from item.
Caption: Parker I think I'll get out and walk.
Illus. in: Puck, v. 55, no. 1421 (1904 May 25), centerfold.
Copyright 1904 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

image.jpg
 

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Title: An English jack-tar giving monsieur a drubbing
Date Created/Published: [London : Robert Sayer], Publish'd May 1st, 1779.
Medium: 1 print : mezzotint ; 35.8 x 26.3 cm (sheet)
Summary: Cartoon showing English sailor beating French nobleman with walking stick while dog attacks the man's poodle; sign above pub door reads, "Keppel's cordial. Harland's intire"; portrait of Admiral Keppel is the sign for the pub. British war ship "Victory" in background. The "Victory" is associated with the French and British naval battle off Ushant in July 1778. The reference to Keppler is acrimonious, as he was court martialled as the result of his conduct during battle. Harland was Keppel's second in command. Sayer sides with Keppel, who had been set up by Sir Hugh Palliser following the stalemate of a battle. Keppel, who won acquittal without comment, was championed by the common sailors.
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-10736 (digital file from original) LC-USZ62-106912 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: PC 3 - 1779--An English ... (A size) [P&P]
Notes:
Forms part of: British cartoon Prints collection (Library of Congress).
Being a history buff, I'm very interested in stuff like this. Particularly the mindset of folks back then( or any given time in history). Political cartoonists are a special breed. B Frankiln dabbled in that, as well.

Adm Keppel led a fleet and spotted and pursued a French fleet ( who had orders to avoid contact). After a heated battle, Adm Keppel was able to regroup to launch another attack, but rear Adm palliser refused.

Btw, was Keppler a typo?

Also, I wonder why Sayer included that couple in the doorway, ignoring the "drubbing".
 

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Title: A rocky road and a bad guide / Keppler.
Creator(s): Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956, artist
Date Created/Published: N.Y. : J. Ottmann Lith. Co., Puck Bldg., 1904 May 25.
Medium: 1 photomechanical print : offset, color.
Summary: Illustration shows Alton B. Parker sitting in a chair strapped to the back of David B. Hill, who is carrying him up a narrow, treacherous, rocky trail on the edge of a mountain "to [the] St. Louis Convention". Hill's walking stick has been broken and mended, it is labeled "Trickery" and "Peanut Politics".
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-25852 (digital file from original print)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1904 (Case X) [P&P]
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Notes:
Title from item.
Caption: Parker I think I'll get out and walk.
Illus. in: Puck, v. 55, no. 1421 (1904 May 25), centerfold.
Copyright 1904 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

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image.jpg
Ahh, this a really interesting "snapshot" into history. I wonder why Keppler chose DB Hill. Perhaps he thought that Parker got to the Democratic nomination on his back( However I can find no connection at all).

DB Hill was Lt Govenor under Grover Cleveland and became Govenor of NY after Cleveland stepped down to pursue Presidency(which he won). In 1892 , he ran against Grover Cleveland( for the Democratic Nomination for President) and lost. He went on to be a U. S. Senator and died in 1910.

Hon. A. B. Parker was a chief Justice for NY Court of Appeals. Nominated on the first ballot at the Democratic convention in 1904, Parker, representing the eastern, pro-gold-standard wing of the party, differed little from his opponent, President Teddy Roosevelt. Parker was soundly defeated, taking only 38 percent of the popular vote and winning 140 electoral votes to Roosevelt's 336. Thereafter he returned to his law practice.

Keep in mind that the World's Fair was also going on in St Louis, so that convention was overshadowed.
 

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I found an article on the 1904 Democratic convention from the St Louis Post-Dispatch who said:

The 1904 convention nominated Alton Parker, chief judge of New York state's highest court, who would lose to Republican incumbent President Theodore Roosevelt in a landslide. At the time, it was the worst drubbing in American history.
 
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