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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do a search on this and you get different answers. I know its a personal opinion, but how do you measure for the proper length stick for your heighth. I thought this would be an interesting topic.
 

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Do a search on this and you get different answers. I know its a personal opinion, but how do you measure for the proper length stick for your heighth. I thought this would be an interesting topic.
As you noted there are many thoughts on this. On canes I use the line at the brake in wrist just above the heel of the palm as a basic length. However I will start out a bit higher, a ½ inch or so. You can always take some off if it is needed. If a cane is not for someone then I will leave the shank at 36" to 40" + handle giving room to customize it. On walking or hiking sticks the grip area I start with is at the bend in the elbow. That is most likely to be between 40 and 50 inches depending on the person and how the plan to use it. I try to start out with a basic length of 55 to 60+ inches. Not including topper if there is to be one. This gives me room to fit it to their wishes. Again you can take off easier than add to. If they will use it for real in the woods hiking I recommend a long grip area and a longer stick. It works better in changing terrain.
 

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have to agree with CV3 thats the measurements i take . always better to leave it slightly longer until the person in question wants it

I Measure to the wrist for a walking stick, to approx elbow for thumb stick and armpit for a hiking pole

Think most stickmakers work on these measurements although you will get different answers so there is no definite answer

A lot depends on the terrain and what type of walker they are
 

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Yup good advice given above. Cant add much except for other than a cane, having a right angle bend and your forearm positioned parallel to the ground is comfortable and natural feeling for walking and hiking sticks. Going longer gives the option of choking down when climbing and choking up when heading downhill.
 

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Do a search on this and you get different answers. I know its a personal opinion, but how do you measure for the proper length stick for your heighth. I thought this would be an interesting topic.
As you noted there are many thoughts on this. On canes I use the line at the brake in wrist just above the heel of the palm as a basic length. However I will start out a bit higher, a ½ inch or so. You can always take some off if it is needed. If a cane is not for someone then I will leave the shank at 36" to 40" + handle giving room to customize it. On walking or hiking sticks the grip area I start with is at the bend in the elbow. That is most likely to be between 40 and 50 inches depending on the person and how the plan to use it. I try to start out with a basic length of 55 to 60+ inches. Not including topper if there is to be one. This gives me room to fit it to their wishes. Again you can take off easier than add to. If they will use it for real in the woods hiking I recommend a long grip area and a longer stick. It works better in changing terrain.
This.

So far I prefer a longer hiking staff that is above my shoulder. But then I do things like pick mushrooms on hilly terrain with no trails so the longer stick is handy to me.

Rodney
 

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biggest problem with long sticks is transpoting them . but one can use a jiont there simple enough to do ,There the same as used in snooker cues ,.there also handy for making interchangeable toppers
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wasn't very specific was I? I meant to ask about measuring for walking sticks. I prefer them just over shoulder height also, even when hiking level terrain. Shortening a stick is indeed
easier than adding to it, measure two or three times and cut once.
 

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In agreement with CV3 and Cobalt, I tend to make slightly longer and allow user to shorten to his/her own preference,this way prevents making it too short and having to add a bit, which happened very early on in the trials and tribulations of stick making. I therefore don't add aferrule unless specifically requeste ,or the stick will be just for in house display .
 

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I know its a personal opinion, but how do you measure for the proper length stick for your heighth. I thought this would be an interesting topic.
One thing besides one's height is anticipated use. ..... Another is the type of shoes being worn - which affect one's effective height.

Everywhere I have looked so far, the Official Word is that a can should come up to the middle of one's wrist.

Seems to me like the implied use there is support - something you lean on, either continually or occasionally.

I see another use that I call "Balance".... where the cane provides a reference point for somebody with impared balance (like Your's Truly).

I am finding that a Balance cane works better if it is about 4" longer than a Support cane.

When I use a Balance cane, I swing it further forward than a Support cane and then walk past it while it is in contact with the ground.... the extra 4" allows a more relaxed swing and gait.

I am also finding that there is an optimal handle for a Balance cane that allows one to relax the hand more while swinging it... I have two canes with that type of handle, but have not been able to find any on the market at this time. ...... In fact, I cannot even put a name on it: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMHDERDPAS7ZNjkd4SjIYEMJIXqtp_qKXEC3olBWOaR3vTHjLy8Ej0Zj0Nhs99Ubw/photo/AF1QipM4M7-YnQqdKnFwudsqU7P5mWPzT2lQKS6_M1Mg?key=WDdSdm4wSG90UkNwMG1FMVdSQ2p0NEFRQThPRVJ3
 

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the only time i use a stick is when i go rambling its a hiking pole and fits to the inside of my shoulder which is handy for both uphill and downhill walking .useful for uneven slippery ground, knocking brambles /weeds out of the way.

Fourtunatly i dont need a walking stick or cane as you call them , i have made a few for people and usually just make them to the wrist and assume that they use a simular shoe all the time but wouldnt have thought 1/2inch would make mush difference

but its always good to have a difference of opinion and to see other points of view ,as its those views cab often help to improve what you do.
 

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I'm glad this came up.

I've changed my opinion since I looked at this thread back at the beginning of the year. I use a cane for support when walking. My prostheticist took one look at the canes I built using the "to the wrist" method and told me they were too short. She was right.

I'm much more comfortable using the canes I built using her way of measuring.

Holding your arm straight swing your arm out in front of you so your hand is about 18" in front of you then turn your palm down. It works out to about 30* from vertical in my case. Then measure down from your palm.

When I was using my old method of measuring down from my wrist with my arm at my side my canes ended up at about 34". Using her method they work out to about 37 to 38" tall. The difference in height means I'm not bending down every time I put the cane out in front for my next step.

I still like my hiking poles to be about shoulder height.

Rodney
 

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When I was using my old method of measuring down from my wrist with my arm at my side my canes ended up at about 34". Using her method they work out to about 37 to 38" tall. The difference in height means I'm not bending down every time I put the cane out in front for my next step.
Exactly!...

The tradeoff seems to be between maximum strength (i.e. minimal elbow bend gives more strength for a given amount of muscle) and the "Flow" of being able to swing the cane forward and plant it on the ground without hunching or bending forward.
 
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