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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been interested in all kinds of walking sticks for a while now, but found out just recently that this site even existed! I'm almost a complete noob to building walking sticks, although I did make one last year out of a premanufactured poplar pole and copper fittings. It came out alright. I have very few wood working tools, and little ability to buy them right now, so I'm looking for ideas for sticks that don't require specialized equipment. I hope nobody minds if I steal an idea or two. But anyway, I'm looking forward to asking a question or two once in a while.
 

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Welcome! We all are perpetually learning. Whether we carve, inlay, or do nothing but smooth down and size it, there's always something to learn. Anytime you use a natural material like wood, where every piece is different, there's always something to learn.

So, ask away, we'll make it up if we don't know it, and I'm sure you'll be able to contribute a mite or two as well.

As Picasso once said, a good artist steals from great artists, a great artist steals from everybody.

Glad to have you.
 

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Welcome aboard Kemjak. I'm pretty new to this with only five sticks finished to date for family, and two more primitive sticks for little grandkids so they won't feel left out. I'll have to make them nice ones when they are older.

My favorite project just now begun is a Bois D'Arc stick for my son. Just started removing bulk with a draw knife last weekend.

I look forward to watching your projects progress and learning new tricks.
 

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Howdy,

Don't worry about the cost too much.

The first walking stick I ever saw being made was a guy carving a broken shovel handle w. a Stanley retractable knife. For starters, it doesn't take much to carve sticks.

It started as an occasional pastime for me. Just cleaning up sticks I found when out hiking. Only needed a saw to trim the ends, a small but sharp knife, and a 4-in-hand rasp. Those are still basic to most of what I do. That, and having a few quiet hours (at least) and some good light.

Do read over the posts here. I learned a lot right away by reviewing the info here, and that solved some probs I was having.

Happy Carving
 

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Howdy,

Don't worry about the cost too much.

The first walking stick I ever saw being made was a guy carving a broken shovel handle w. a Stanley retractable knife. For starters, it doesn't take much to carve sticks.

It started as an occasional pastime for me. Just cleaning up sticks I found when out hiking. Only needed a saw to trim the ends, a small but sharp knife, and a 4-in-hand rasp. Those are still basic to most of what I do. That, and having a few quiet hours (at least) and some good light.

Do read over the posts here. I learned a lot right away by reviewing the info here, and that solved some probs I was having.

Happy Carving
I second the cost remark. My new draw knife makes life easier, but my trusty old KA-BAR would remove a lot of wood fast so long as I kept it sharp. I have limited room and inclination to purchase power tools, so rasps and knives are my primary weapons of mass destruction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. I spent a couple of hours reading over the site, and saw a lot of nice work. I think I've decided to try making a shillelagh. Only problem is, where I live, decent wood is hard to find.
 

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Where do you live, in general? You might be surprised what wood is good and what isn't for this purpose. If you've got any trees or even woody shrubs, I bet we can find something that will do. I'm making a very nice cane for my wife out of a branch from a crepe myrtle shrub. Surprisingly durable and stiff, and beautifully white and wavy once you get the bark off.
 
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