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WOW,getting pretty trick with the copper pipe huh...Is there wood inside the first one??? I bet it polishes up good...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
WOW,getting pretty trick with the copper pipe huh...Is there wood inside the first one??? I bet it polishes up good...
Thank you -- yes, there is a hardwood dowel on the inside of the copper pipe on the first one -- it gives the handle stability, although it is also filled with epoxy at the handle joint, it's pretty solid.
 

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WOW,getting pretty trick with the copper pipe huh...Is there wood inside the first one??? I bet it polishes up good...
Thank you -- yes, there is a hardwood dowel on the inside of the copper pipe on the first one -- it gives the handle stability, although it is also filled with epoxy at the handle joint, it's pretty solid.
Aaaah,I see...Sounds like a good idea...WTG...
 

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Regarding picture #3: 3/4 copper pipe walking stick. Never even crossed my mind. I could solder one up in a jiffy. Extremely light in weight, very stiff, only subject to discoloration at the hand hold area, once the varnish coating wore off. Frapped with Stainless Steel wire in the hand area would work, though.

I love metal, but this just doesn't turn my crank, I want real wood under my hand in a walking stick.

Now that I have developed an interest in making sticks, I've noticed more people that use them. All around here use a metal cane, from their medical supplier. Duct tape on the handles seem to be the major modification. That seems to me to be a comfort issue. How do you fit a cane to a particular person?
 

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Regarding picture #3: 3/4 copper pipe walking stick. Never even crossed my mind. I could solder one up in a jiffy. Extremely light in weight, very stiff, only subject to discoloration at the hand hold area, once the varnish coating wore off. Frapped with Stainless Steel wire in the hand area would work, though.

I love metal, but this just doesn't turn my crank, I want real wood under my hand in a walking stick.

Now that I have developed an interest in making sticks, I've noticed more people that use them. All around here use a metal cane, from their medical supplier. Duct tape on the handles seem to be the major modification. That seems to me to be a comfort issue. How do you fit a cane to a particular person?
I see more and more people where I live using medical canes. Most are aluminum tubes. I've recently noticed "faux" wood complete w. grain and knots. The thing I wonder about is if they would stand up to a sideways pressure, and bow or crumple.

In the same line, I wonder how stiff a length of copper tube might be.

I suspect that the duct tape on the medical canes is to remedy the soft foam rubber that usually is on the handles when it collapses.

The standard length for a medical type cane designed to aid balance is that it should be about as long as is needed for the handle to fit in the space between the thumb and index finger when that arm is hanging at rest. For myself, that is too short. When I need support for my back problems, I must not lean forward, and so a longer cane that allows me to push down, and flex my spine back ward is good. So, my opinion is that for best performance, each stick should be fit to the owner.
 

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I think I`d fill the inside with some of that expading foam to maybe give it some firmness once it sets up and hardens....

I think copper takes on some petina with age...
 

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Gdenby,

I suspect you are right about the duct tape. I'll just have to ask the next time I see someone using one.

Copper pipe is surprisingly stiff. It is harder to bend than EMT conduit, and wants to collapse in the bend, and go oval. That's why you can't bend copper pipe if used to carry Pressure, wheather the medium is liquid or gas.

So for length, make it long, and cut to size, then add the bottom ferrule. Got it, thanks!

Paul2281,

The expanding foam would take the hollowness out of the sound of it when it hit something.

Copper pipe has a layer of clearcoat on it, but if removed by sanding, the copper would take on a patina in a big hurry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think I`d fill the inside with some of that expading foam to maybe give it some firmness once it sets up and hardens....
I think copper takes on some petina with age...
It has a hardwood dowel inside to attach the topper (it goes the full length) and I did do three layers of clear coat.
 

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A plumber should have the tool to bend copper pipes its pretty easy. Filling it with something would hep make it stronger

Rad has done the sensible thing to put a wooden handle on the pipe copper will effect your skin and yes it turns green when it ages so you do need to varnish it to prevent it.

Try wearing a copper ring next to the skin it will turn green not good for you.

Also i think a wooden shank is just as strong as pipe as it will give flex but a pipe will just suddenly bend if it is subject to a lot of pressure parcticulaly if the pipes not straight,

But if it works for go for it.

We use the height of the wrist for measuring a stick for someone to use but as rad says ihe may need a slightly longer one if it helps his back then its the right height for him

There are no definates about anything its just what you want"

Its also good to see people try different things and good to know the results of it as they say" one mans meat is another mans poison" but i dont thnk you will beat a nice stcik made from a nice variety of wood they should outlast copper pipe its soft material
 
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