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Nice haul. I'd say hickory was a distinct possibility for a lot of them. Don't see any which appear birch, though. I would be willing to bet that at least the one second from right was hornbeam. It has the typical rippled, muscular-looking bark and you say its very heavy.
 

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After expanding the picture a bit, I can see the same feature, though not as pronounced.

That's a problem I've run into a few times; cutting a stick and not being 100% sure what the wood is. (Or knowing what it is when I cut it then not being able to remember what it is when it has dried.) I now usually take a sharpie marker with me and mark the cut ends. A for ash. M for maple. etc.

Like Rodney mentioned, you should try digging one to see if you can get a nice root handle. I like to probe around the base with the blade of my saw and see what it has for roots.
 

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I mark mine with the species when I know it and the month and year it was picked. That way I have a better idea of whether they're dry enough to use yet or not.

Figure a year per inch of thickness as a safe rule of thumb. Lighter species generally dry faster than denser ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm really new to this so identifying wood is tough, especially this time of year when most if not all of the leaves are gone. Some may be dense hardwoods and others not. I try to get an idea by tapping the back end of my machete on it to get a feel for the density. I do plan to sell them at craft fairs and such and I think knowing what wood it is would be helpful but I guess as long as it's a hardwood species that finishes nicely and will last, that's all that really matters. And also , because I will be selling them I hope to need new inventory every year. Here in Virginia you kind of have to collect in the late fall through winter if you can to avoid the ticks and chiggers. Between Alpha Gal (red meat allergy) and Lyme disease, you really want to avoid ticks here. I'll be going out again this weekend and Thanksgiving weekend since I'll be off for four days and the weather looks good. I hope to have 30-40 this season, add more next season then work on this seasons haul over the late winter through summer of 2020. Can't really do anything but collect until this seasons haul is dry so I also plan on working on other craft items to sell during this coming summer.
 

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Yeah we have the ticks and blackflies here, so I know what you mean.(Heard of a few cases of the meat allergy thing plus a lot of lyme disease.) Deerflies, horseflies and mooseflies, too. Number one item in my stick collecting kit is bug spray. I like to collect this time of year, but unfortunately, it's hunting season so I don't go near the woods. I tend to go in late Sept to Oct.

A twig identifier can help some if you can't tell the species by the bark.

https://www.thoughtco.com/dormant-tree-identification-gallery-4122781
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
As you can see I used some old paint to seal the ends but I promise the pink will come off when I finish them LOL. some of the later ones I used white glue thinking it would drip less than paint but it's about the same. But I just dunk them then let them dry. Do you brush off the excess or just let it dry thick?
 

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Mostly what I've used is shellac-more because it was handy than any other reason. I just wipe it on and leave it. I don't think thick or thin matters as much as just having something there to slow drying down.
 
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