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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have no doubt that this has been asked before.

I have a crack in the top of one of the sticks which I have been drying in my garage. I intend to finish this stick with Danish Oil.

I propose to fix this crack with a 'sawdust paste' made from white wood-working glue and fine sawdust from the stick.

What do you think? Should I go ahead with that or stop now and do something else?

Cromach
 

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This past week I filled a similar crack using Elmers yellow wood glue and wood sharp-point toothpicks. Covered with glue I pushed them in as far as they would go, broke them off and put in the next one side-by-side. I was able, fortunately, to fill that entire area with wood...once 100% dry, I sanded it off and was very pleased with the results.

I'll try that trick again, when/if the need arises.
 

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Checking or cracking as a stick dries is normal. First I would ask how long has it been drying? A generally rule of thumb is a minimum of 6 ot 8 months of air drying if it was a fresh cut stick. If you can, always cut a stick 4 to 6 inches longer than you want it so if it checks as it drys you can cut it off. If you are nor sure it is dry yet I would put mark at the bottom of the crack and wait 30 days. If it has not cracked any more it most likely is ready. If you have the room I would cut off the cracked area. Maybe add a topper to it or use it as a cane rather than a walking stick. If you need that lingths see if you can close the crack with a clamp. If you can, I would use one of the poly glues like Garila glue. It will be much more weather resistant. If you have to fill it I would suggest water resistant glue with you sawdust filler not white wood glue.
One thing to keep in mind is there is always a chance a stick will crack. Drying and finishing grately minimizes that chance but it is wood.
Good luck I look forward to seeing you finished stick and how you resolved your problem.
Randy
 

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I usually cut my sticks very close to the finished size, and whittle the ends while they are soft and pliable, especially the bottom end for a good tight fit for the rubber boot (hand tools only). Whether the ends are roughed in or not, I apply two or three coats of oil over the next few days. This allows the ends to dry at the same rate as the rest of the stick...the only cracked ends I've had is when I didn't apply the oil in my earlier days of stick crafting.
 

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Cracking and checking is a bone we have to deal with in almost all wood. Kiln dried wood is not as susceptible though I have even seen small cracks appear in basswood I have purchased as carving blocks.

I have filled small cracks with Titebond III waterproof exterior wood glue and saw dust as a paste. If the cracks are too large I will discard the stick or repurpose the wood as smaller pieces such as cane handles & carved toppers.

Mark
 

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I just cut the shank longer than i need . then i air dry the shanks for a year, have`nt had any sign of checking.I dont treat the wood in any way. mayby its the type of wood you use some will crack more. but hazel never seems to give me that problem whilst drying,

Would have thought wood glue and sawdust is as good a way as any
 

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This past week I filled a similar crack using Elmers yellow wood glue and wood sharp-point toothpicks. Covered with glue I pushed them in as far as they would go, broke them off and put in the next one side-by-side. I was able, fortunately, to fill that entire area with wood...once 100% dry, I sanded it off and was very pleased with the results.

I'll try that trick again, when/if the need arises.
Good tip,
 

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If the shank I have cut is close to required length, prior leaving to season I dip the ends in melted Candle wax for approx 3 inches, stops the ends drying quicker than the bark covered shank which is usually the cause.
 

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To me the best answer is to cut the cracked part off. If it's not long enough for a walking stick you might be able to make handles or something else out of it. I wouldn't trust a repaired stick to hold my weight when I needed it to.

Rodney
 
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