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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just grab your trusty KABAR!

(And do something nice to appease your wife.)
 

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Looking good. Are you trying to take off the last of the bark or reshaping the stick?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looking good. Are you trying to take off the last of the bark or reshaping the stick?
Thanks. As everyone has figured out by now, I don't know what the heck I'm doing. I did soak this in Pentacryl for over a week, and of course wasted that which I've whittled off now, at $60/gal.

My hope is that the Pentacryl treatment will allow the bark at the top to remain, for a really good grip. And I plan to whittle down the rest quite a lot more, rasp it down some and then sand it. Then I will likely use the clear Danish oil, and then polish with some really expensive wax I got at Woodcraft.

If you guys recommend that I go ahead and remove the bark at the top too, I will do that. If there is little chance it will remain after the green wood dries, or that it will serve as a comfortable grip, then I should remove it now. I have no experience on which to base my actions. Except the use of the KA-BAR, and that was fun.

Also, I'm not a very proficient knife sharperner despite the many stones that I have. I just picked up an electrical knife sharperner at Woodcraft that uses 1/2" (?) belts with varying grits, that the sales kid said works really well. Guides ensure the proper angle for each side. Hope I didn't screw up there. I've been using the KA-BAR to whittle now for only perhaps three or four hours. At some point I will need to sharpen it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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I'm a bark lover. I like the contrast of sapwood and bark. It wouldn't hurt to leave the bark on if your likeminded and let it dry

like that. You can always sand it off in the future if you don't like it. :)
 
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My sharpening stones and finishing soapstone has been passed three generations go far. If for no other reason, I'll keep traditions alive. My Grandfather was a carpender and used the same stones to sharpen his hand tools. That coming from back in the day where no power was at the work site. Yes I still have his tools and also some very nice cooperage tools in their original chest he owned. GOD I miss that man as well as my Dad. They both taught me much.
 
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