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Using a Odies oil finish. The original Odies oil is a thick mixture and very little is used for a per coat on a surface like a tabletop. I watched several youtubes on applying it and while it looked good on a smooth surface were wiping on and wiping off is a simple task. The process requires wiping on, letting it sit for about an hour then thoroughly removing all remaining oil with a towel. Waiting overnight and repeating that prosses with each coat. I saw an issue with buildup of the oil in carved detail. Especially small detail that I do. I sent Odie Oil an email questioning if it was good for wood carving with detail like eyes, hair and so on. They replied within a few days with a phone call. Nice guy and very helpful. He recommended not using original Odies oil on carvings. They make another product called Odies Super Duper Oil. (Strange name). It is a thinner version of the same oil. The recommendation was to apply it in a thin coat with a brush. Make sure you get in to all the detail. Let it sit for an hour wipe off and bush out any oil in the detail or better yet is to blow out the detail with your compressor if you have one. He recommended 3 coats using the same sequence between coats as above. It is good indoor and out. He said he has some chain saw carvers that use it. Also good for live edge and bark edge pieces. I am finishing up a cane and plan to try it on soon. But it is not simply wipe on, and you done. The process is not unlike tung oil. It looks like it will cure a bit faster. I think it would be good on an natural stick with bark removed. Just thought I would share what I had learnd.
 

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Using a Odies oil finish. The original Odies oil is a thick mixture and very little is used for a per coat on a surface like a tabletop. I watched several youtubes on applying it and while it looked good on a smooth surface were wiping on and wiping off is a simple task. The process requires wiping on, letting it sit for about an hour then thoroughly removing all remaining oil with a towel. Waiting overnight and repeating that prosses with each coat. I saw an issue with buildup of the oil in carved detail. Especially small detail that I do. I sent Odie Oil an email questioning if it was good for wood carving with detail like eyes, hair and so on. They replied within a few days with a phone call. Nice guy and very helpful. He recommended not using original Odies oil on carvings. They make another product called Odies Super Duper Oil. (Strange name). It is a thinner version of the same oil. The recommendation was to apply it in a thin coat with a brush. Make sure you get in to all the detail. Let it sit for an hour wipe off and bush out any oil in the detail or better yet is to blow out the detail with your compressor if you have one. He recommended 3 coats using the same sequence between coats as above. It is good indoor and out. He said he has some chain saw carvers that use it. Also good for live edge and bark edge pieces. I am finishing up a cane and plan to try it on soon. But it is not simply wipe on, and you done. The process is not unlike tung oil. It looks like it will cure a bit faster. I think it would be good on an natural stick with bark removed. Just thought I would share what I had learnd.
I'm new to this so bear with me if my questions seem out there. Has anyone tried ronseal yacht varnish on their sticks? I bought a very nice looking blackthorn from Ireland finished with it and looked great. Similar method as you describe above, 3 coats, each coat needed to dry, followed by light sanding in-between. It finished with a nice deep shine like several coats of clear coat on a custom painted car. Curious if anyone has any tips using it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm new to this so bear with me if my questions seem out there. Has anyone tried ronseal yacht varnish on their sticks? I bought a very nice looking blackthorn from Ireland finished with it and looked great. Similar method as you describe above, 3 coats, each coat needed to dry, followed by light sanding in-between. It finished with a nice deep shine like several coats of clear coat on a custom painted car. Curious if anyone has any tips using it?
Hi, Super Snake. I have not used that brand but I have used marine finishs for years on many sticks. Mostly Helmsmen spar Urethane. They are a great finish for sticks. I started using oils like Tung oil and Teak oil becouse they are not just a surface coat, they soak into the wood and if there is some damage like scratches and dings it is a easy fix to just add some oil. And I like the softer oil finish look. Oils are a bit more work requiring more time. I will share how the Odies oil works this is the first time I have used it.
 

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Hi, Super Snake. I have not used that brand but I have used marine finishs for years on many sticks. Mostly Helmsmen spar Urethane. They are a great finish for sticks. I started using oils like Tung oil and Teak oil becouse they are not just a surface coat, they soak into the wood and if there is some damage like scratches and dings it is a easy fix to just add some oil. And I like the softer oil finish look. Oils are a bit more work requiring more time. I will share how the Odies oil works this is the first time I have used it.
Thanks much for info CV3. I use my stick in all kinds of weather for my walks which is why the ronseal caught my attention. Since it seems to be pretty tough to find here stateside, I'll definitely try the Helmsmen spar Urethane. I assume you can brush the helmsmen directly onto the bare wood without the need to apply a preparatory coat of primer first? Point well taken about the benefits of using the oils but do they protect the stick for outdoor use in different weather conditions? Or maybe it's advisable to use an oil followed by the marine finish? I feel fortunate to have many excellent wood varieties to include black cherry, hickory, and so on and would like to keep the natural color of the wood as much as possible. I've found my first several blanks to get started with and look forward to using the many great tips found on this site. Thanks for your time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks much for info CV3. I use my stick in all kinds of weather for my walks which is why the ronseal caught my attention. Since it seems to be pretty tough to find here stateside, I'll definitely try the Helmsmen spar Urethane. I assume you can brush the helmsmen directly onto the bare wood without the need to apply a preparatory coat of primer first? Point well taken about the benefits of using the oils but do they protect the stick for outdoor use in different weather conditions? Or maybe it's advisable to use an oil followed by the marine finish? I feel fortunate to have many excellent wood varieties to include black cherry, hickory, and so on and would like to keep the natural color of the wood as much as possible. I've found my first several blanks to get started with and look forward to using the many great tips found on this site. Thanks for your time.
I use 3 coats of the helmsmen satin finish. the first coat I mix 50 50 thiner and helmsmen. Dry 24hr's and light sanding with 220 grit between coats. The satin is still shiny but not plastic looking. I will also put on a thin coat of good old J&J wood floor wax. If there is a litte build up of wax in small areas just hit it with a hair dryer. We have alot of weather here, 83 inches of rain last hear. I have had good look with that as a finish. I have used a mixture of teak and Tung Oils made by "Circa1850" it has held up very will in walking sticks. Pernitrates deeper than tung oil alone and the tung oil protects and gives it a more finshed look.
 

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I use 3 coats of the helmsmen satin finish. the first coat I mix 50 50 thiner and helmsmen. Dry 24hr's and light sanding with 220 grit between coats. The satin is still shiny but not plastic looking. I will also put on a thin coat of good old J&J wood floor wax. If there is a litte build up of wax in small areas just hit it with a hair dryer. We have alot of weather here, 83 inches of rain last hear. I have had good look with that as a finish. I have used a mixture of teak and Tung Oils made by "Circa1850" it has held up very will in walking sticks. Pernitrates deeper than tung oil alone and the tung oil protects and gives it a more finshed look.
I hear you about the rain CV3! Just moved from the Houston area to upstate NY. Harvey did us nasty in H-town. Appreciate the response. That's the route I'll take.
 
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