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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I remember when this young man was born, we've know his family that long. But the main reason I'm posting this here today is to ask the question, could that be an Osage Orange tree?

IF so, I'm going to ask for sticks, Sticks, STICKS!

:cool:

-neb
 

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Nice picture. I don't have direct experience but my understanding is Osage Orange is a scrubby large shrub/ small tree.

The bark looks like Locust to me. It's another wood with a reputation for being hard and rot resistant. I would think you could get some good sticks from it too.

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
NOT to be controversial but in our parts there are rows of Osage Orange - they are maybe 15' tall - the trunk is very twisted and knarled.

Thanks for your input - I KNOW the lady who owns that property and will ask her for a stick.

-neb
 

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Can't tell from the pic, but the twigs should have small thorns on them, and the young bark should be slightly yellowish. The old bark does look rather like osage, but it also looks like mulberry. I've spent more time than I like trudging out to hedgerows hoping to find a remaining osage orange, only to find a mulberry. Their shapes can be very similar, but the mulberry doesn't have the thorns, and it becomes obvious what they are from a dozen yards or so away.

Black locust is uncommon around here, honey locust, somewhat more common. The honey locust is covered in hundreds of huge thorns, up to a foot long. The black has less and smaller. Even the "thornless" cultivars have some thorns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I stand corrected - according to the lady who owns the property that's a willow tree - I should have known with it being so close to the lake.

Oh well...the search continues.

-neb
 
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