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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who uses flex shaft grinders, Dremels or other power rotary tools for carving? I haven't tried it yet, but am strongly considering it and wonder what tools and burrs you favor.
 

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I have used one for many years. They are very good for shaping and detail clean up. I have a Foredom. I went though a number of dremal tools they just did not hold up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have used one for many years. They are very good for shaping and detail clean up. I have a Foredom. I went though a number of dremal tools they just did not hold up.
What are the "must have" bits and burrs?
 

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There are a number of answers to you question Rodnogdog. Most all your flex-shaft tools handpieces take 1/8th and 1/4 inch shank burrs your better ones also take 3/32nd shank burrs. A good basic set of 1/8th inch shank carving diamond burrs is a good starter. you can get a set of 28 at woodcraft for about $27. If you are wanting to do rough shaping and smoothing out your deeper carving cuts then you will want bits for that. I use Saburr burrs I get from Woodcarver Supply. I find the flame shape and the ball are the most useful. They come in ex-coarse.coarse and fine. I prefer the fine for the way I use them. Like any thing else to do with carving the choices are many. And it depend on how you plan to use the tool and burrs. There is a learn curve with power carving. First is to let the tool and burr do the work. A light touch when starting is a must. I would recommend. testing it on scrap of the wood you are going to be working with. A burr can dig in quickly on softwood and bounce across the top on harder woods, leaving marks that are a pain to sand out. When it comes to the tool itself I would recommend a veritable speed. If you are just going to do light work, detail and cleanup. You may do fine with a Dermal type tool but if you are going to used for waist removal and on hardwoods. Then something like a Foredom. A flex-shaft that will do at leased 15000 rpm's . I use my tool for many different things from carving to jewelry, cleaning parts and buffing small objects, cutting and grinding. If you get in to high speed tools( rpm's over 30000) then the rules change on burrs. You need to make sure the ones you get are made for those speeds. It is a good idea to make use all your burrs are rated for the max rpm's on what ever tool you chose. I hope this is of some help. There are many types of burr, carbide double cut, ruby,ceramic, sapphire and the list goes on. I have wasted a fair amount of money just to learn that for carving I use the basic burrs I listed at the top was all I really needed .

Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Randy, thanks for your detailed post. That took a lot of effort. I have been studying this for awhile and finally decided to order a Grizzly flex shaft grinder and a variety of double and single cut carbide burrs with 1/8" and 3mm shafts. The Grizzly motor will turn 15000rpm and comes with a hand piece that has a 5/32" chuck. I would eventually like to order the Foredom 44T hand piece too which comes with 1/8" and 1/4" collets and has an optional 3mm collet available. I have also been admiring the Saburrtooth burrs. Maybe Santa will remember me this year.

Gordon
 

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I have a few friends that use the grizzly tool. They are real happy with them. It is nice it comes with a handpiece with a chuck head. I bought one for my Foredom. It much quicker when changing bits and you do not have to switch out collars going to a different size shank.
 

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Totally agree with cv3 about the power tools
I have 3 suspended from The roof in the workshop wouldn't be without them.
There great for detail work.
But always uze a dustmask when sanding they create a lot of fine dust
 

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Thanks for all this great info! I purchased a Dremel with a flex attachment and I never got it to work well for me. I've been thinking about this subject for well over a year, but didn't want to fork out the cash unless I was confident the purchase would be smart.

I'll move ahead soon. Like Rodnogdog, maybe a birthday or Christmas purchase.

Then, on to learning more about woodburning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all this great info! I purchased a Dremel with a flex attachment and I never got it to work well for me. I've been thinking about this subject for well over a year, but didn't want to fork out the cash unless I was confident the purchase would be smart.

I'll move ahead soon. Like Rodnogdog, maybe a birthday or Christmas purchase.

Then, on to learning more about woodburning.
The Grizzly flex shaft unit is very economically priced and has mostly good reviews and a 1 year warranty. You can by 3 or 4 of them for the price of a Foredom. Check them out here: http://www.grizzly.com/products/Flex-Shaft-Grinder/G9928 It's the unit I just ordered - it will be here tomorrow! I am looking forward to playing with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Got my new toy today - don't have a clue what I'm doing with it yet but I can tell you can screw up a bunch of wood in a hurry with it.
 

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Got my new toy today - don't have a clue what I'm doing with it yet but I can tell you can screw up a bunch of wood in a hurry with it.
You have that right! Spend some time on scrap wood before you jump into a prodject. A change in the density on the wood can send it of in a direction you do not want it to go. Takes a light touch and practice.
 

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You will get used to it but try what CV3 has said

use a off cut if you like it you could use it as a topper
 

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I use one of those on larger projects. They are good at cleaning away waist wood. I second the need for wearing safety gear.
 
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