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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the things that really intrigued me while working with Cane #86 - Black Locust - was how the "rings" became very evident in those two severely damaged (via power mower) areas. They were not that obvious until I applied one coat walnut stain and they really popped out.

And then the Tung oil (3 coats) added depth, I think.

As I've said before when cane making stops being fun, I'm done.

(Not any time soon!)

-neb
 

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The figure pops out quite nicely. On a bunch of my sticks I've started w cross sections that are too thick Just so I can flatten off sides, or carve hollows into them. That way the ring and grain structure is shown, and the stick ends up lighter and easier to carry.

Doesn't work w. all kinds of wood. I see the locust has large pores to suck up lots of stain and oil. Most red and black oaks are the same. Likewise ash. Sassafras is doubly nice. It has open pores, and the grain is often twisty enough that smoothed off areas have a sort of rippled look. The wood is easy to cut, but in most cases, stiff enough to make a good stick.

Beech, white oak, cherry, most maples have really tight grain, and finish up much plainer.
 

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What gdenby said. Your wood has a ring porous structure. Most hardware store stain finishes are pigment based stains. Pigment stains highlight the grain pattern because the pigment sticks in the open pores more than the surrounding wood. It also sticks in any deep sanding scratches that may have been missed-I didn't see any on yours. :) Bringing out the grain like you did adds a lot of interest IMO.

By contrast, I've tried pigment stain on maple and it hardly colored the wood at all. No open pores to stick in. Dye stains color wood evenly. The color particles are much finer and are able to penetrate wood much better regardless of grain structure.

I usually don't see dye stains in hardware stores. Specialty woodworking stores carry them and they're available online. I've also used RIT dyes with some success though I'm not sure about long term light fastness.

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Even though I've been at this woodworking gig for almost 35 years I am STILL LEARNING! Non-woodlovers/workers may not fully understand the almost "joy" and sense of satisfaction of seeing the potential in kindling and then making something worthwhile from it. That still gives me a kick.

Further, even though I'm 82 (am I the eldest of the elders?) it's flat out FUN to learn stuff here. I've been using Minwax products since the get-go and am quite pleased. . . especially when wood grains pop out and really sparkle.

So thank you guys for your input here.

I'm still learning from you.

-neb
 
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