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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometimes when sanding cane sticks/shanks because of the grain it just won't lay down and behave itself. And in the past I've used a sanding sealer made by Minwax which works. I usually apply it in the evening, allow the piece to dry overnight and the next day be able to complete the sanding. However, that happens so infrequently I don't need a quart. Nor do I want to use a spray can, if I can avoid it.

Any better ideas here?

Thanx

-neb
 

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First off, I've got some Minwax sanding sealer to use on wood like pine and maple that doesn't stain very evenly and I didn't think it did the job very well.

Now, for sanding, some folks sand the wood as well as they can get it. Then they wet it and let it dry or dry it with a hair dryer if your in a hurry. The fibers will stand back up so you can sand them off again. Repeat this until they behave.
 

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I've never used actual sanding sealer, I usually put a coat of whatever finish I'm using on then sand lightly or use some steel wool after it dries to take care of any raised grain or other issues. The finish also tends to highlight any flaws in my sanding that I missed the first time.

Wetting the wood down like LilysDad said works too.

Rodney
 

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I must admit that I'm too lazy to strive for near-perfection. I usually sand down to only 220 grit, and if some deep flaws remain, I call it character. But then my work is mostly used for off-road walks where the sticks are quickly scuffed up, even with a nice ferrule to protect the lowermost few inches.

I am continually amazed at the fine craftsmanship that I see here. I'll never acquire that level of skill.
 

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I was watching a You tube video on woodturning the other day and the piece was apparently covered with little fuzzy bits of tearout because of the grain. Rather than continuing to sand it, the turner gave it a light spray of denatured alcohol then set it aflame. I thought he was nuts for doing it, and would not recommend it, but afterwards a couple of coats of Danish oil and some woodwax 22 and it looked great.

The method Rodney describes is the way I do it; a coat of finish (polyurethane in my case) and light sanding after it dries.
 

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Gotta agree with CAS, it's a walking/hiking stick a little bit of imperfection here, there, what's the dif?

Where I have my issues is trying to get the fuzzzies out of a carving with out sanding out all the detail off that U just whittled in!

Somebody have an easy solution for that one I'm all ears!

Might have to take a piece of designer firewood and try that denatured alcohol trick see what that does to a carving :thumbsu:
 

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. Rather than continuing to sand it, the turner gave it a light spray of denatured alcohol then set it aflame. I thought he was nuts for doing it, and would not recommend it, but afterwards a couple of coats of Danish oil and some woodwax 22 and it looked great.
Sounds to me like he's been eating in Greek restaurants!

Where I have my issues is trying to get the fuzzzies out of a carving with out sanding out all the detail off that U just whittled in!

Somebody have an easy solution for that one I'm all ears!
I would suggest that your knife needs to be sharper. A sharp knife leaves a smooth surface that needs no sanding. Or your cutting against the grain and leaving a torn surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Stay tuned, friends-o-mine. Pics of the finished product to be displayed here within the next 2-3 days, if all goes as planned. And yes, I purchased a life-time supply Minwax Sanding Sealer for $16.00.

Need some?

-neb
 
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