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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had this (and another) "glass" door knob since last year, saving them for some future project and now that it's been firmly established that the tulip poplar shaft is rather boring, I'm thinking about dressing it up with the knob, after the tung oil and polyurethane finish coats.

My concern is this is a first for me and I'll be working with three hole sizes and depths . . . thus my plea here today.

It's my thinking that I'll attempt to drill the correct depth and dimension for that threaded square rod first, taking it at least 2" deep, hopefully square and dead center of the shaft. I'll follow that with a spade bit to fit the next larger section and then widen that one same hole with another spade bit to fit the final section of the knob assembly. I want to hide that small screw used to hold the threaded rod in place on the door itself.

Once I've established it's a good fit, I'll secure it with some Gorilla glue and let it set at least overnight.

However, before I proceed, I'd certainly appreciate any input.

Thanx

-neb
 

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If you wish to sink b into the shaft use a spade bit 1st to drill a hole to fit then drill the right diameter hole to fit the bar . as its square use epoxy putty to attach it it will infill any gaps made by the straight edge of the door knob .It will make it stronger to infill any gaps caused by this .There would be no need to drill another hole into the shank to secure the handle with a screw the epoxy will do it. As theres some play on the door handle shaft the epoxy should help in alignment if its not quite straight as well . It shouldnt be a problem i do all my fixtures using hand eye .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RIGHT - I had 100% forgotten about drilling the spade bit first - followed by the smaller dimension for that lower section.

WHEW! thank YOU

-neb
 

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I'll be interested in seeing how this works out. I also have an old glass door knob that I've thought of using in the same manner. Mine has a slightly different design. No "B" section, and the "A" section has a set screw in it that I wouldn't want encase.

I've tried various glues and epoxies for setting items into my stick. The thing that was easiest for me to use were epoxy clays designed for wood. I found them much easier to manipulate than trying to accurately mix a 2 part fluid which I then had to try to not get all over the wood as I tried to fill the place I was doing the inset.
 

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Most of the time 5 minute epoxy are good. You may want to consider Gorilla Glue. It expands as it dies. This may work better with your the square shaft. If you sand the brass area that will be in the hole with 80 grit the Gorilla glue will expand into the scratches. You go have to be carful to clean away the Gorilla glue as it expands. I would put some painters tape around the glass base to keep what ever glue or epoxy you use of the glass. It will make a nice top.
 

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I use a 5 minute epoxy as CV3 suggested for attaching toppers to sticks. It's available at any hardware or box store and is relatively inexpensive. I've not tried Gorilla glue I'm sure it works equally well.

I got several tubes of the epoxy on sale so I have quite a bit to use up before I try another adhesive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I found a long time ago it takes patience and the willingness to accept change.

Even though I thought I could - with your help - attach that door knob to the tulip poplar shank, I've discovered the top of the stick is too narrow. So I'll have to seek some other top, perhaps another T-handle - and save these door knobs for some future sticks/canes.

Thank you one and all

-neb
 
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