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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about building a shaving horse for working on walking sticks, as well as other projects --- Anyone else ever built one, or do you use one? I would be interested with some input concerning design and functionality -- especially from those who have used one, but I am open to input from anyone! I've attached a picture of one model.

3z8uJxH.jpg
 

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Friday, I picked up one of these at Rockler in Plano, TX.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18917&site=ROCKLER

Here's the plan.

  1. Cut a couple of 3" or so lengths of 2" x 4" lumber.
  2. Use a 2+" door handle hole cutter and cut that large hole in one piece.
  3. In the other piece, drill a smaller hole, perhaps just 1 1/2" diameter or so.
  4. Cut both pieces in half, lengthwise, so that each piece has just half a circle cut out.
  5. Line one of each size with some sticky-backed fabric like the stuff you use on the bottom of a rocking chair.
  6. Screw one of each size to two sides of the hand-screw clamp.

Then my hope is that I can use this anywhere to secure either the larger or the smaller end of a stick, when I whittle or use the draw knife. I'm behind on so many projects that I can't promise when I will next report progress on this.

Vance
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Friday, I picked up one of these at Rockler in Plano, TX.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18917&site=ROCKLER

Here's the plan.

  • Cut a couple of 3" or so lengths of 2" x 4" lumber.
  • Use a 2+" door handle hole cutter and cut that large hole in one piece.
  • In the other piece, drill a smaller hole, perhaps just 1 1/2" diameter or so.
  • Cut both pieces in half, lengthwise, so that each piece has just half a circle cut out.
  • Line one of each size with some sticky-backed fabric like the stuff you use on the bottom of a rocking chair.
  • Screw one of each size to two sides of the hand-screw clamp.
Then my hope is that I can use this anywhere to secure either the larger or the smaller end of a stick, when I whittle or use the draw knife. I'm behind on so many projects that I can't promise when I will next report progress on this.

Vance
Looking forward to the finished product -- if I start my horse, it won't be till Easter break.
 

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Rad, this should be easy to do. I think I might have time this weekend if the grandkids aren't running all over the place.
 

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I had trouble finding good plans. The best I saw were from " The Workbench Book" by Scott Landis. Mine is a modified version of what he showed, a dumbhead plan is also in the book. I tried to make mine a little more verstile by adding more holes in my arm and tiller. I put this one together with wood that I already had lying around. You can really make it to suit your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I had trouble finding good plans. The best I saw were from " The Workbench Book" by Scott Landis. Mine is a modified version of what he showed, a dumbhead plan is also in the book. I tried to make mine a little more verstile by adding more holes in my arm and tiller. I put this one together with wood that I already had lying around. You can really make it to suit your needs.
I figured that I would do the same -- kind of do my own thing -- thanks for the extra pictures!
 

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Rad, I saw this article and thought it might be of use. http://www.newagrarian.com/2011/07/18/the-thirty-dollar-shaving-horse/

I also found a crude picture of a horse similar to mine. My only recomendations other than shown are:

  • Use either oak or maple dowels.
  • Use solid wood for the seat, and make it narrow, I slide back and forth depending on the size of the piece.
  • Make sure the plane of your table extends beyond the frame of the horse.
  • My front leg is at 15o , my rears are compound 15o.
  • Don't sink a lot of time or money into it, it's going to get beat up and you might find you need one that works differently down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you Markus! I did see that artical before -- I really like your design.
 

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Any clamping is better than no clamping. But it's still amazing what you can do with just your body if you're willing.

Any time I start to get bent out of shape wishing I had the latest gadget and high-tech tool (and mine are even just hand tools) I keep reminding myself what our ancestors (and many even today) can create with very simple tools.

My parents saw one of these guys in Islamabad, Pakistan. It's still a way to get your work done in a large swath of the world without power or big machines


And the modern master of the ancient art of bowl turning on a foot-powered lathe, western style.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
AAAndrew -- I know! But I'm not that talented! So I have to rely on tools and machines! The jaw horse works pretty well, although it may not be as handy as a shaving horse, it has advantages that a shaving horse does not.
 
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