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Cobalt talked about safety in a post in the section on tools. I thought it would be a good subject for general discussion. I am sure we all have some good tip. One issuer that you do not hear a lot about is safety with found wood. Lumber we find or is given to us. We need to be sure what's in it or on it. Nails, wire, small rocks. things that can damage tools and or become missiles when using power or mallet tools. Also chemicals that may be in the wood or on it. A number of years ago I got real sick from some wood that a friend who worked on the Mobile docks gave me. We have ships from all over the world coming in to Mobile. He had some 6"x 6" X 6' mahogany that had been used as blocks to set cargo on from South America. He gave me 2 of them. I was so existed about having the wood I did not think about what it may have been sprayed with. I still do not know but ended up in the hospital the day after I started cutting it up. That night my wife as me if I had been spraying something. The point is if it comes from a barn, factory, old building or you not sure were its from and there is a chance there could be chemicals on it you may want to think twice about using it.
 

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I soak my green sticks in a solution called Pentacryl. At my age, anything that might cause me to develop cancer in the next 20 years probably isn't what's going to kill me. The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that the source provides does not look like the typical MSDS required in the USA of most industries selling or transporting chemicals. It does say that it isn't toxic. However the typical MSDS shows toxicity, carcinogenicity, and mutagenicity data.

I still use Pentacryl, but I recommend examining the MSDS for all chemicals used and then make your own judgment regarding the health risk.
 

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It is mentioned in earlier posts on the forum, but anti-cut carving gloves or finger protectors are a very good idea.

I'm retired now, and am rather happy to not be using power tools. I enjoy the more relaxed pace of working w. hand tools. But as part of my employment, I used to spend a good bit of time in a wood shop. Ear protection and eye protection were required. Whenever possible, all saws had to be used w. blade guards. We had an industrial grade dust collector, which was loud enough that when running that alone required ear protection. Likewise, we had a vent hood for when items were being spray painted, coated w. sealers, etc. Had simple dust masks available, and a few higher grade masks that filtered toxic gasses. All toxic and/or flammable materials were stored in locked metal cabinets. Gloves and shop aprons were optional, but used frequently. Really strong lighting.

There was a big first aid kit next to the door and a fire extinguisher.

Not using power tools keeps me from loud noises, dust, the hazard from starting a fire if a saw went thru a nail or staples, and threw sparks, etc. I wear long sleeves, and a leather shop apron, and have a carving glove. I make sure to was my hands frequently if I'm handling woods that might cause an allergic reaction, and sweep up dust and shavings about once an hour. Cuts and scrapes seem unavoidable, so I have some antibiotic salve and a selection of bandages in a drawer.

Need better lighting.
 

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Some wood dust is toxic. In particular the bark of black cherry when sanded can produce cyanide as do the leaves. There are other woods that are listed as respiratory irritants as well, e.g. pine species. ( I personally have a severe allergic reaction to pine dusts) A couple of exotic woods I have read can cause death! It is highly recommended to wear a good dust respirator when sanding any wood as dust particles of any type in your lungs can cause immediate as well as long term health issues.
 

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After several trips to the eye Dr. Because of getting wood or metal splinters in my eye -- I'm a big believer in eye protection!
The metal splinter has been the worst! It required a double inversion of the eyelid and a magnet on the eyeball!
 

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After several trips to the eye Dr. Because of getting wood or metal splinters in my eye -- I'm a big believer in eye protection!
The metal splinter has been the worst! It required a double inversion of the eyelid and a magnet on the eyeball!
OUCH!
 

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After several trips to the eye Dr. Because of getting wood or metal splinters in my eye -- I'm a big believer in eye protection!
The metal splinter has been the worst! It required a double inversion of the eyelid and a magnet on the eyeball!
OUCH!
That hurts just reading It !!!
Yes, well, I should have known better the first time -- but I did it more than once!
 

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Keep your blades sharp, cut shallow and always keep super glue handy. Dull tools cause you to push harder, and trying to cut to deep does the same thing. This is when accidents occur, one slip and the force you are exerting carries the blade hard and fast. Superglue instantly seals cuts, it's liquid suture
 

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Keep your blades sharp, cut shallow and always keep super glue handy. Dull tools cause you to push harder, and trying to cut to deep does the same thing. This is when accidents occur, one slip and the force you are exerting carries the blade hard and fast. Superglue instantly seals cuts, it's liquid suture
Super Glue -- one of the best inventions ever!
 
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