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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Fellas,

When I cut my tenons to join a stick to a handle I generally make it around 25mm (1") This is for a thumb stick, wading staff or market stick type (in general the longer sticks.) I have made shorter sticks with Derby type handles and joined handles on these types of sticks and I have a tendency to make these tenons slightly longer as, in my mind I thought that these may come under more pressure as you may put your full weight onto them.

My question to any of you fellas is; a) Do you believe that the joints should be strengthened with some sort of rod or bar? or, b) Do you just use the mortice and tenon joint, if so what length of tenon?

I know this may seem a basic if not ridiculous question for some but, I wouldn't want a stick that I have given someone to break do to bad workmanship.

I await your wisdom!

Thanks Neil.
 

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I always use a 8mm threaded bar for all my shanks at 4 inches long 2inchs in shank 2 inches in the topper when I dress the stick

This seems to be the general practise here so its tried and tested
 

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I also use a threaded rod . I go to 2 to 3 inches into the shank and a bit over halfway to the top of the topper.
 

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I use a threaded rod too. 3/8" diameter with at least a couple inches in the shank and whatever fits in the handle, usually about 2" there too.

I know others use and advocate mortise and tenon joints and it is a strong joint, but this is what works for me. It's easy to get a decent fit using the rod too. Mortise and tenon joints need more precision to get a good fit IMO.

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you fellas, I knew I would get some great feedback from you. I have seen two types of threaded rod, regular steel and also stainless steel. Is there a difference whereby either will "react with the epoxy? N.
 

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Both are totally encased in the wood and epoxy. I would just use regular steel-the cheap stuff. Mostly I use whatever is handy. Some of us like to screw the sticks together. I don't. Plain with no threads would work just as well if you're just gluing it together like I do.

Even the poorest steel is going to be stronger than the surrounding wood.

Rodney
 

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Iwould think Rodneys right but i prefer the threaded bar as it does give more grip for the epoxy and think you get a better grip on the shank for the thread
 

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I allways use 8mm threaded rod, the length of the rod can vary dependant upun handle topper desing, especially when checking grain direction.

Whn I do my dog toppers I like the grain to run in the direction - Nose to back of head.

This makes the grain run at 90 degrees to the threaded bar, whic can lead to a weak point between the top of the bar and nose of the dog.

my way I make the inserted threaded bar deep enough in the head to pass this point ow weakness.

also if you fit the thread bar as the firs job when pattern cut, you can use apiece of 2 x 1 timber with a 8mm hole drilled in. fasten the blank via the threaded bar with a washer and wing nut - you can the use this as a basic carvers vice by clamping it in a vice and turning thro. al 4 sides and rotating int working position by slackening the wing nut and rotating the blank.

Hope this is helpful to you
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I reckon that would make a very handy jig Gloops! I understand the reasoning of setting the threaded rod deep into the topper because of the grain direction, that way there is not enough material above the rod to accidentally be levered off during the stick's use. Cheers pal. N.
 

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I also watch how the grain runs when I carve and basically do the same when I do my toppers .I Also insert a hardwood dowel through the handle of the cardigan sticks or a threaded bar to strengthen the handle .then cap it it with buffalo horn or a contrasting wood before I shape it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks cobalt, I am taking as many of these tips in as I can, I know I can always refer back to them though if I need to. N.
 
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