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I have found a problem with the finish on the stick I made into a monopod recently. For the last few weeks I have been using this with no problems with the finish. Today there was a fair amount of rain with temps in the low 60s. The stick was first stained and given two coats of clear lacquer. It appears that the clear lacquer around the areas that would be handled most are a little rough and look dull as if the lacquer has worn away. The lower half of the stick which would be handled much less with regular use appears OK.

I don't want a thick clear shell as a finish but did expect the lacquer to hold up a little better. My plan will be to steel wool the piece and apply another couple coats of clear lacquer. Is there a better choice???
 

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Being that I know next to nothing about finishes, I'll simply wish you the best of luck in your endeavor and wait to see the responses myself.
Luck be with ye.
 

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Lacquer as a rule works well with furniture better than on sticks. It is more of a indoor finish. Most every one fines a finish they feels meets their needs best. Living on the gulf coast with a average rain fall of 65" a year an a lot humidity I mostly use marine finishes. I use a marine Tung oil or Midwax semi gloss spar urethane. With both I do a 50%-50% mix with mineral spirits for the first 2 coats. The thinned finish soaks deeper in to the wood. I give the stick 24 hours minimum to dry. Longer if it is very humid. I sand lightly with 240 sand paper between coats. Then I use a full strength coat of the finish I am using. Some times more with the Tung oil. Once the finish is dry These finishes hold up very well in rain and ware. I will also do a coat or 2 of Johnson & Johnson floor wax on the urethane. The oil finish just requires more oil to touch it up. This is just what works for me. I hope it is of some help.

You might want to try the floor wax on your lacquer finish. It can help protect it. Apply the wax in thin layers and if you have a hair dyer us it to melt the wax in.

Randy
 

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I just use a danish oil its a mixture on tung oil and varnish.trouble is with a hard varnish finish its subject to chipping and looks unsightly after a time where moisture and dirt get in it.

Wheres as a oil basically anyfwood finishing oil would do the job and generally speaking it always looks good ,just needs a oocasional coat

They say coat 1 a day for the 1st week, 1 once a week for a month then once a month for a year ,after that a couple times a year

Its all subjective and down to personal taste
 

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+1 on what CV3 said! I use a lot of spar marine finish -- also, you want to make sure that your wood is really cured!
 

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I've tried a number of things. Here's a quick run down.

First tries were what i considered standard practice. A few coats of stain, lightly sanded, followed by a few coats of spar varnish. Looked a little "plasticey," but not too bad. After use, the grip areas dulled. Sometimes if the varnish went on over bark, eventually it bubbled up and fell off the bark.

Tried paste wax over stain. Not certain what was going on, but sometimes the stain seemed to mix w. the wax, and then the wax would rub of on hands.

Tried shellac over stains and dyes. Shellac was nice. It could be tinted w. dies, and used at various concentrations, which allowed subtle shading. Very lusterous finish, but, like lacquer, not good for exterior use. Clouds when exposed to water, and not very hard.

Tried putting a carnauba based wax over shellac. Hard to do, but seems stable.

Then started multiple coats of tung oil. Works very well, tho' it adds a fain yellow tint.

Switched to teak oil. Its thinner than tung, and penetrates harder, denser woods. Not as strong of a tint, but somewhat glossier.

Still messing w. the carnauba wax, and a few others. Carnauba wax and some similar waxes need a lot of friction heat to melt, and buff in smoothly. Lots of elbow grease. Had some decent results using a heat gun on low, followed by a quick buff, but its tricky.
 

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I like spar varnish but it is hard to buff out.

As for laquer I use to use it all the time but winter would come around and I would walk with my cane, and I came to realize that the laquer was chipping off to say the least I wasn't happy with it.

I also like polyurathane as well because it is a lot easier to buff..
 

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Spar Urethane for tough outdoor finish . I also use Minwax polycrylic a water based urethane product, I like it over painted sticks.
 
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