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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know buying the best quality tools is the way to go in the long run, but can the above tools serve a purpose for the beginner and, or, traveler? Would they also help in determining if a certain tool is worth buying in a more expensive quality tool? Thank you for any help.

Also, does anyone have photos, plans, or links that I can use to fabricate a portable holding device for carving walking sticks?

Again thanks.
 

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I can only suggest a workmate with the vice clamp, that will give you the best of both worlds you will have some large jaws on the workmate and the vice clamp will help on small pieces other then that drill a hole in your picnic table and just use the vice clamp.Its very good i wish i had bought one years ago

CV3 has a good portable tool caddy but space sounds a premium with you ? other than that drill a hole in the picnic table thats already there , but i dont think that would go down to well.

WEll long term all tools sre worth buying as long as there good quality, buy good , buy once

but you dont need lots of tools to start ,but do get good ones they hold there edge better. a couple of carving knifes and palm chisels will get you going and mayby a clamp to clamp things to the edge of a table

I ddont like the workmate it has its uses , but the thing is not the right height for me.and can be back breaking when used for long periods.

My old bench was knocked togther with waste wood but i made it to the height thats suits me .
 

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I'm not familiar w. Warren Tools, but if price indicates anything, they seem to be better than "beginner" quality. Haven't found any reference to what steel is being used, or what the Rockwell hardness is, which would be more helpful in determining the quality.

Seems like the Warren tools are a reasonable starting point. The choice of handles will let you determine what feels good in your hand. But after awhile, swapping the gouges and blades back and forth will become tedious. By that point, you may know which tools are your favorites, and consider buying better ones of those. And/or buying several more so that you don't have to stop a carving session to re-sharpen. For instance, I have 3 of the same kind of Mora carving knives just because I like the way they preform for the types of cuts that I make.

Also, really inexpensive tools often have a hidden price, which is called frustration. As a beginner, frustration can exact a heavy toll. Nothing like botching a finishing cut because the cutting edge crumpled under pressure to turn a stick to "designer firewood."

For myself, most of the portable benches thew wrong height. For some work, I like a surface around 40" high so I don't have to bend over. For other work, like detail carving, I want a surface that is around waist height. A a result, most of my detail work is done sitting on a bench with a heavy pad over my legs, and a carving glove on my gripping hand, aka, lefty.

Also, think about sharpening. It takes some practice, but being able to put a good edge on any tool is necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gdenby,

Thanks for the input. At age 65 with a suspect back, the workmate type benches probably won't be good for me. I will come up with some type of clamp that can be used on a picnic table.

I probably have a dozen different carving tools made by Pfeil and they seem to be a quality item. The Warren tools from what I have gathered through internet research are made from spring steel and can be resharpened. I was thinking this might be a decent start for my wife who is kind of "iffy" on the wood carving and would also give me some insight on the different type blades.

Thanks for the replies!
 

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I am relatively new to carving as well. The Pfeil tools you mention I have seen at Woodcraft, this is the first I have heard of Warren tools. They are a product made in the USA and to me, that's a plus. I like to support our home country's business's when ever I can. I'm not sure I would like to keep changing the tools in the handles though, especially the knives.

I purchased my first batch of carving tools from Flexcut also a USA company. They offered the gouges and chisels in both the removable handles or solid piece. Flexcut are reasonable priced tools and I have been happy with them so far.

We do a lot of travelling/camping in a small motor home and I also carve on many a picnic table. I have a small clamp on vise that opens to 3" I picked up at Farm & Fleet. It works OK, for the $20 it cost me. If your staying in campgrounds you make do with what you can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
MJC4,

I just got 2 flexcut palm tools but haven't used them yet. I agree they are reasonably priced and US made.

Wood spirits are the only thing I have carved to date and these have been done on walking stick size wood with full size Pfeil carving tools. I wanted to try some palm tools for easier control.

I'm at the campground for the summer so I will come up with a suitable holding device.

Thanks for the input!
 

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Cobalt, I'm guessing the import tax and the shipping (small quantity being shipped over) has over inflated the cost of the Flexcut tools.
 

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Like every where there is always good alternatives and theres less restrictions in the EU with tax etc so easy to get european stuff and very good tools

But i am impessed with the stuff from japan there blades are the best i think.
 

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Hi Airborne,
Have you seen the Rockwell Jawhorse? It can be used for many things and is very portable. Check price on Amazon.It works great for holing sticks. It is a investment but its versatility made it worth it to me.
https://www.rockwelltools.com/en-US/jawhorse_rk9000.aspx

This is one I made and can be clamped to a table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
CV3,

I've given some serious thought to the Rockwell Jawhorse and Amazon does seem to have the best price. I wonder if it would be too short for carving as my back isn't in the best of condition. But I keep telling myself it can do so many other things! There are several models in various price ranges and the one I researched was about $159.00 from Amazon, but the exact model number escapes me now. What model do you have?

I absolutely love your stick holding device and want to thank you for posting them. Is it being held by the Rockwell?
 

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CV3,

I've given some serious thought to the Rockwell Jawhorse and Amazon does seem to have the best price. I wonder if it would be too short for carving as my back isn't in the best of condition. But I keep telling myself it can do so many other things! There are several models in various price ranges and the one I researched was about $159.00 from Amazon, but the exact model number escapes me now. What model do you have?

I absolutely love your stick holding device and want to thank you for posting them. Is it being held by the Rockwell?
No. In that picture it is in a Black and Decker workmate. But is dose works on the Jawhorse also. I also have a bad back and two new hips. Standing is a pane. The jawhorse will hold the stick very tight. I use a
cheap wooden bar stool. You can put the leg of the horse though the stool and sit up on the carving. If
you look at the foot of the jaw horse it has holes. To raise it I have used a 4'x4' and bolted the front feet to it and setting the back on one. You can use some 6'x6' 3/4 plywood squares and build up some
blocks to whatever height you would like for your back. Just using them while carving. I made a plan for the stick jig a few years back for a class. I will see if I still have one. Not sure I do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
CV3,

I would be very interested in your plans for the vise if you can find them.

I would think the dowels on chains are of different diameter to coincide with different diameters of sticks?
 
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