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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several weeks ago I bought a set of three Stanley wood chisels at Ace Hardware, and just got around to using them yesterday. I was wondering if maybe any of you could decipher/explain this warning on the flat side of all three chisels. Apparently it is assumed the "user and bystander" have only one eye. Each.
Can you believe this?
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"Warning
Wear safety goggle user and bystander"
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-neb
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those three new chisels as well as six others NEED sharpening. The local place now charges $4.00 each to sharpen flat chisels. WOW! You guys got any tricks/easy way to sharpen wood chisels? - - - w/o a fancy jig/fixture?

It seems to me that since it already has a factory made/supplied 45 degree (??) angle on the blade would not just sharpening the flat side do the trick?

Enlighten this OLD geezer, please.

thanx

-neb
 

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Sharpening is always a huge (and dangerous) topic for discussion. Friendships have been destroyed over it. :)

For me there's more than one right way and it comes down to whatever works best for the individual.

I use a waterstone and a chisel sharpening jig to maintain the bevel on mine. Too much opportunity for error without the jig for me.

You can also use various grits of sandpaper glued to a hard flat surface to get started. Look up "Scary Sharp" for that method. It's cheap to get started but sandpaper does add up over time.

The carvers in the group know far more about sharpening than I ever will but a well sharpened tool is a pleasure to use.

Are Stanley tools still made in the USA? That warning reads like a bad Asian translation.

Rodney
 

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I forgot to add: Flatten the flat side once. With proper care it should stay flat. Sharpen from the bevel side. You need to remove a lot less metal when sharpening just the bevel. Once they're properly sharpened, factory chisels rarely are completely sharp, it doesn't take much to maintain the edge.

Rodney
 

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as Rodney has said never sharpen the flat side .keep it flat . it will cause you to dig into the wood where you don't want to and you wont have full control .Its important to maintain the correct angle which will vary depending on the person and is always a matter of debate .You usually find your own way of both cutting and sharpening to suit you

Its like scissors or shears they will not cut if you try to sharpen the flat side
 

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Since I have only one eye that still works, I'd wear the safety glasses, but then I have survived a long time taking stupid risks repetitively. I wonder if someone makes minion goggles with just one lens so that I could save some money? ;-)

:lolu:
 

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I agree with Rodney, this looks like it has been written by some non-English speaking supplier! We have a Stanley factory close by but you'd like to think that it would be printed correctly in the English speaking countries that make Stanley tools. I have always had good experiences with Stanley tools. N.
 

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I recall reading at least 10 years ago that Stanley off-shored some of its production. First, to someplace in the Caribbean, then China.

What I was taught is that what is good in most cases was a "micro bevel" at the edge. (google that, if you like) For flat bench chisels, that means honing down the edge a few degrees flatter. Seems counter intuitive, but the small slightly flatter wedge allows the chisel to bulldoze into the grain, and then let the wood ride up over the main bevel. They also are designed for roughing out.

Eventually, the bevel rounds off, and must be renewed. When it becomes too thick, then the principle bevel must be restored. I had a chisel at work that had seen over 50 years of use. Thankfully, by that time I was good enough w. a large belt sander that I could restore the main bevel in a minute.

For home use, an inexpensive jig can be found for maybe $7 - 8, and a double grit sharpening stone will do.
 

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HI,

Check this youtube video out, shows the simple cheap jig and process for sharpening and making a simple setting guide to sharpen all flat chisels easily

To sharpen use varying grades of wet and dry carborundum paper as used for car body work, cheap and effective, stick onto a piece of wood

 
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