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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I first began stick making, I cut the stick to length and trimmed the side branches flush to the shaft. As the stick began drying, the ends and the exposed areas from the cut branches began to check, crack or split. That led me to cutting the sticks longer than the finished stick would be. When I started to cut off the side branches, I would notice that if I left some of them long I could use it as a nose or perhaps a beak or a snout.

These pictures show how I have used side branches, odd bends, knots, etc. and work them into my sticks.
 

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Love the way you used the features of the stick Ron Nice scales on the snake in the diamond willow.
 

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Phenomenal work. I especially like what you did with the diamond willow. Reminds me of something M. C. Escher would have done, if he had a piece of diamond willow, and he were a wood carver.
 

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Beautiful and very skillful work! My favourite piece is the snake emerging from the knot-hole, very clever, and unique. Thank you for showing. N.
 

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Thanks to all of you for taking the time to view the pictures and, especially, for leaving comments.

Most excellent! Some of those pictures look like they were taken in south Florida?
Gordon, all of those pictures were taken on my patio which is covered with potted plants.
 

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Ron thanks for joining the forum. Your work is inspiring and your advice to trim things long and leave them until the stick is dry is dead on-both from a checking and an aesthetic standpoint.

I don't carve but you've already helped inspire me and to look at things differently than I might have before.

Rodney
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ron thanks for joining the forum. Your work is inspiring and your advice to trim things long and leave them until the stick is dry is dead on-both from a checking and an aesthetic standpoint.

I don't carve but you've already helped inspire me and to look at things differently than I might have before.

Rodney
Hi Rodney, thank you very much for your kind words. I'm really happy to be here and the posts from all of members have really gotten me thinking about walking sticks again.

You say you don't carve but would you mind telling me why you don't. When I first started collecting sticks, I didn't do anything with them except round off the ends. I would look at them and have no idea what else to do. I was at a campground and one of my wife's friends picked up a stick and my pocket knife and started digging around on it. All she did was carved my initials in the stick but it looked so cool and inspired me to try other things on the stick. That led me to try carving.

As you can see from my hands, just holding tools was a challenge. These pictures were taken when I was able to carve. I'm seriously thinking about trying to carve again although it will be a much greater challenge now.

Thank you all for the inspiration.
 

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...As you can see from my hands, just holding tools was a challenge. These pictures were taken when I was able to carve. I'm seriously thinking about trying to carve again although it will be a much greater challenge now...
Ron, would some different handle shapes help any? You are a very talented guy and you obviously love it.

Gordon
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
...As you can see from my hands, just holding tools was a challenge. These pictures were taken when I was able to carve. I'm seriously thinking about trying to carve again although it will be a much greater challenge now...
Ron, would some different handle shapes help any? You are a very talented guy and you obviously love it.

Gordon
Gordon, sorry it took so long to get back to you on your question. I somehow overlooked your post. Unfortunately, the problem is the muscles in my arms and hands are very weak which makes it difficult for me to hold and use the tools for any length of time. Also, the more I use the muscles that we can they become. It's a real Catch 22.
 

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Why don't I carve? I guess the simplest explanation is I know my limitations.

Some people can play music, paint or carve. It's more than just the technical ability, skills can be learned. It's the creative part of the person that hears the music, sees the image in the wood or sees the picture on the blank canvas that separates the artistic from the merely skilled.

My talents lie more on the technical or craft side of things than the artistic side. I can make a very useful, even attractive, stick - just don't expect me to carve anything more complex than a comfortable grip on it.

I have a lot of admiration, even envy, for those who do have true artistic talent.

Ron I am in awe of your ability to carve like you did with your hands and arms in that condition. Your work is far better than what most healthy people, myself included, will ever achieve. I hope you're able to find a way to work around your disability and continue carving.

Rodney
 

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I can fully relate to what Rodney is saying, I too know my limits and although I love to make sticks, I know how far to go.This is not being defeatist just realistic. I can see the beauty in carving and I think this is why I enjoy seeing it done well. N.
 
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