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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just added the first layer of paint to the snake I've carved on the walking stick.

Next layer will be red.

I intend to make this a mutlicolored snake, just to do something a but different.

Would love to have your comments or suggestions.
 

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First off, the scales are remarkable.

I've seen a few snakes in the wild, and certainly enough in pictures, but I've never paid much attention to the specifics of the patters. So I don't know what direction your painting may take.

I can comment on paint colors. Painted some myself, and have a number of friends who are pretty accomplished.

One trick that a number of them used was to first paint a contrasting color to the final surface color that would go over it over it. For example, a bright red that would eventually be covered by green leaves. Where the top layer(s) of pigment were opaque, the final color would be evident, but where it would be thinner it would be somewhat browned out from showing the underpainting, making for subtler color. Intentionally, the area would not be completely covered, allowing the contrasting color to "pop" the edges of the area. A more subtle way of outlining spaces w/o resorting to just a dark line.

One problem w. using contrasting color is that they can cancel each other out. It can be tricky to get the right balance of area so the eye doesn't mix the two into a grey somewhere in between the two. Personally, I've used a method that uses 3 tones with good results. There is a primary color. Then there is a related companion color, used in small quantity, that is similar to the base. In the case of the light yellow green snake, perhaps a bit of darker green that is a little bluer. Then the contrast color might be either shifted from red toward magenta, keeping the contrast from negating the prime color, and becoming somewhat resonant w. the companion color.

But I don't know if this method in any way would suggest a real snake, or just a phantasm.

My .02.
 

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You can always add a pearlescent tint to the paint certainly helps the look i oftern use it when i paint wildlife

but going well different style from what i have seen here

my work in progress just unsure of the scale yet but have commiyed myself to it

Wood Art Font Facade Creative arts
 

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thought this a better part for pineapples lol

drawing done very crude and quick template made with 1st and 2nd cuts on the bandsaw has to be complete for christmas hate rushing[

after the first cut i tape everything back together then lay the template back on draw it again and make the 2nd cut it just saves a lot of carving

attachment=560:003.JPG] Green Gesture Wood Line Material property

hope to get it carved in the next 2days
 

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The piece looks pretty crude but once i get the chisels in and the rotary tool it should take shape i hope crossing fingers
 

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  1. started carving still very basic yet very fiddely to do ,
  2. daylight not so good today eletric lights cast to much of a shadow to carve well.Hope its better tommorow
  3. this is where i am at
  4. Green Gesture Petal Pattern Nail

Wood Artifact Art Tints and shades Sculpture

thinking about using ink to tint it with? depends how it goes may be going in the bin if not satisfied
 

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Just about finished that dam pineapple just have to varnish it and mount it on a ash shank with a 4" threaded steel bar with a silver collar. . Will give the shank a few coats of danish oil .Customer will have it on mon. i hope

Plant Gesture Wood Thumb Pattern
 

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pineapple done and dusted . found it a bit dull to carve.

In need of motivation the light to bad to carve so looking at designs to make whilst these short daylight days are with us.?

Checking out ships figureheads and more gothic medievil carvings , have some life drawings already done but dont know if theres much call for nudes but mayby do them in art deco style?

just as long i have some carvings lined up for the better weather .just got 3 hazel , 2 chestnut and a couple of ash shanks left

Didnt sell many over christmas but spring is coming and the hikers will start so hopefully they will want a designer hiking pole just as long as its not a pineapple

Fancy doing some busts of historical figures like , napoleon, wellington , lincoln and lord nelson so will have to see when i get the drawings scaled to fit its only then these things take my fancy.
 

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May have been dull work, but looks pretty good. Will be immediately recognizable.

I do recall seeing a few nudes on walking sticks. I suppose they were carried by bachelors hanging out at the gent's club.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was quite surprised as to how well the stick turned out and I ahve had several people ask for a simular colored snake.

I painted the eyes black and they really stand out.

I use water base acrylic paint and after the paint is dry, I cover with several layers of poylurethane.

First off, the scales are remarkable.

I've seen a few snakes in the wild, and certainly enough in pictures, but I've never paid much attention to the specifics of the patters. So I don't know what direction your painting may take.

I can comment on paint colors. Painted some myself, and have a number of friends who are pretty accomplished.

One trick that a number of them used was to first paint a contrasting color to the final surface color that would go over it over it. For example, a bright red that would eventually be covered by green leaves. Where the top layer(s) of pigment were opaque, the final color would be evident, but where it would be thinner it would be somewhat browned out from showing the underpainting, making for subtler color. Intentionally, the area would not be completely covered, allowing the contrasting color to "pop" the edges of the area. A more subtle way of outlining spaces w/o resorting to just a dark line.

One problem w. using contrasting color is that they can cancel each other out. It can be tricky to get the right balance of area so the eye doesn't mix the two into a grey somewhere in between the two. Personally, I've used a method that uses 3 tones with good results. There is a primary color. Then there is a related companion color, used in small quantity, that is similar to the base. In the case of the light yellow green snake, perhaps a bit of darker green that is a little bluer. Then the contrast color might be either shifted from red toward magenta, keeping the contrast from negating the prime color, and becoming somewhat resonant w. the companion color.

But I don't know if this method in any way would suggest a real snake, or just a phantasm.

My .02.
 

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Painting a three dimensional object can be difficult ,it seems that you can get more expression painting a two dimensional object and use a greater variety of colours. I find it difficult to paint a 3d item as your not able to use the same method of painting as a 2d. In 2d it allows the use a wider rang of colour, highlight different features to emphersize depth and shape ,easyer in some way.The danger of painting a 3d piece s that you oftern seem to flattern the object and find you need more tone .Just me i suppose. Theres nothing worse than a flat colour.This light dosnt help to paint.Also i think that oils give a much better depth of colour easy to build up colour rather than just paint on resulting a flat finish, but the curing time is a pain.

The detail like scales are interesting as the carving allows depth and better realisum, but never stop learning it all helps to achieve your goal.

the puppets i carve i use enamels and always give it a matt finish for puppets reflective light from gloss finish is very ditracting during a performance,and even the booth is finished in matt.I dont use the same paint on hiking poles just a standard finish..some of the carvings i do i just use a clear varnish giving the item several coats with then give then a rub down with sandpaper between coats.

Shanks i just give several coats of danish oil, find that the varnish will oftern chip allowing water in and it will damage the shank if consistantly wet, and tell people to give it a coat of finishing oil 1 or twice a year to keep it in good order

But most people find the finish to suit themseleves and there way of working
 
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