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Agreed! The cultural factors working against this, are that in the typical office building, the dress code has steadily relaxed over my career. Forty years ago when in the office, I wore a suit or slacks and a sport jacket, and a tie, as did just about everyone. Today, as many wear blue jeans as slacks, and if slacks, some sort of "Docker" or similar slack that costs less and doesn't last as long as a pair of Levi's.

I'm guilty too, I complain to my wife on days when I have a business meeting and have to wear "grown-up clothes." I'm guilty as charged, often wearing Levis today, of course now that I'm not concerned with pay raises, promotions, etc., just being compensated based on what profit I can generate for a very small company (six employees/partners).

Still, I'd carry a walking stick downtown in a heartbeat if it wouldn't make folks cross to the other side of the street.
 

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For many of us, the day is approaching when we must have an assist. Then the choice will be manufactured or stylin' with a stick tailored to your taste. When the day comes, I'm gonna be ready.

Sanding now on pecan harder than rock.
 

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Ok, great points! I'm ordering an iPhone bracket to sit atop my walking stick!
;-)
 

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After a youth doing farm work, three years mostly outdoors in the Marine Corps, and decades as a geologist commonly in the field, the sun has taken its toll. Hats are mandatory.

Hat etiquette however, has been mostly lost. My grandfather, my father, and then my D.I. demanded that hats, covers will be removed when indoors. I still remove my cover, but I seldom see that respectful custom practiced these days.

I agree, hats and nice walking sticks mesh well.
 

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Qualitative vs. quantitative attributes. Some craftsmanship has attributes that can be measured, quantified, and objectively evaluated. The Stradivarius had some such attributes as well as some subjective attributes. Much about walking sticks is highly subjective, as we each have personal notions about what constitutes beauty. There must be quantifiable attributes as well. The market-driven valuation may be different, driven by speculation about profit as much as the perceived artistic qualities and craftsmanship.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We each like what we like, and that is really all that matters. But some sticks will have a broader appeal than others. That's always thought provoking, and it may serve to push us out of our comfort zones by interesting us in new ideas to try.
 

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Hat stories (true): had a big Marine buddy from west Texas. After the corps, one evening he went to a bar that had advertised a free drink for anyone who wore a cowboy hat.

He wore his Marine Corps ball cap there. When he asked for his free drink, the barkeep said no, that he didn't have a cowboy hat. My friend lifted up the barkeep against the wall, and said "where I come from, this is a cowboy cap." He got his free drink.

Lots of country boys prefer ball caps, but in my generation the bills were formed in a stylish curve and we never wore them in a goofy sideways or backwards orientation.

Maybe not too funny now, but at a younger age it was pretty funny.
 

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Have a good felt Stetson but haven't worn it in 30 years, back when we lived in Houston and went out two-steppin'.
 

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Looked all over for the Stetson. My wife thinks I gave it to Goodwill (a charity) years ago during a move. So here's my current cowboy hat. Also note the Buchanan plaid!
Arm Tartan Musical instrument Human body Wood


Sorry, the room is dark and the iPad camera didn't adjust as could a real camera.
 

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No need to apologize, cobalt. Best of luck to you and your friends and family there. I had a neighbor who is now gone, but who was a decorated navigator for a bomber stationed in England. Once, he described to me how he came to have a wooden leg.

They had been shot up over Europe the previous day, had minor repairs made, and took off again the next morning, heading for the channel. The plane began shaking terribly, and then began to break apart. Parachutes were hanging by a door, and he grabbed his and put it on. The plane blew up and he lost consciousness. Then, while falling through the air, he awoke just long enough to pull the rip cord, before passing out again. What woke him was his partly severed leg hitting him in the head.

As luck would have it, he fell into the edge of a forest, next to a road. A vehicle that was carrying a nurse to work at a nearby military hospital was driving down that road at that very moment, and saw him descend, as his chute was caught up on the tree limbs. They cut him down, stopped the bleeding, and rushed him to the hospital.

He returned to become a senior level geologist at Tulsa's Cities Service Company. His name was Fred Oglesby. Fred passed away about ten years ago.

Those were difficult times a few years before I was born.
 
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