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Don't think its because we wear jeans and T's. I think its because nobody really goes on a "promenade." Recall, at one time even a gentleman walked farther in a day than most homeless do now.

Still, I think there is a change going on. While I always had a stick around for hiking, I do sometimes carry a cane or stick 'cause my knees and back aren't as good as I would like. And I'm noticing more fellows doing the same. Not just the aluminum canes at every pharmacy, but real wood, carved to various degrees. Even saw a suited shaved head gent at 1 market holding what appeared to be a Jersey giant cabbage stick.

I think the popularity is already there, and growing, whatever the reason.
 

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You are quite right. Gentlemen do appreciate style. I was commenting that a hundred years ago, because everyone walked a lot, a gent could show style with a well carved and appointed cane. Now, it seems to me, aside from a good suit, the stye shows from a cell phone or a fancy watch. Walking sticks don't seem to fit as well w. contemporary urban life as they once did.
 

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It occurred to me that though I've seen as many canes, walking sticks, and staffs in museum's as I have seen on the streets, that there must still be quite a few antiques around. Turns out that there are a great many. Often spectacularly embellished w. gold, silver, ivory, semi-precious stones, etc. I suspect if there is a great return of popularity, not only would contemporary makers have to compete w. plastic and aluminum canes, etc., but the huge number of fine works that have the added value of age.

Hard to make an item of distinction among such competition.
 

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As far as I can see, those antique canes are already out of reach for me and most others. I used to run and antique shop and go to every auction I could for stock. Anytime a good walking stick came up it went for too much money to make any profit on. I wanted them mostly for myself so I decided to try and make my own. I liken this to the resurgence of interest in acoustic musical instruments. The price for good vintage guitars etc. soon outpaced my ability to buy them, but I could buy a good new one to play and that is the beauty of it, thoses new ones got better and better to compete with the vintage ones nobody could afford. I think there will aways be a market for quality whether antique or just created by a good artisan.
I worked in a university art museum until retirement. It was closely associated w. the art department. I was fortunate enough to handle a very large amount of fine work. I also was able to associate with a number of fairly successful artists.

As far as I can tell, all living artists are not only competing w. their contemporaries, but their predecessors. But the contemporary has the disadvantage in the market of still needing to eat and sleep. If, at some point, the stock of fine historic canes is depleted, and the demand remains, a contemporary might, just might, command a better price than a predecessor.

Speaking of acoustic instruments, its been a few centuries since we've heard a new Stradivarius. Is there a walking stick maker of comparable reputation?
 

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To add to the list of gentleman's accessories, Spats!

I recall from my old scout's manual the pic of a fellow happily striding along with his ankles enclosed w. spats. And, as several articles have mentioned "The last time walking sticks were popular was when Fred Astaire..." Many pics of Fred w. cane, spats, tails, etc. I sincerely doubt I will ever wear a top hat. A fedora, maybe. But I would consider spats.
 
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